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Dismal Six Weeks for Bush Has Supporters Edgy

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  • Dismal Six Weeks for Bush Has Supporters Edgy

    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Since the beginning of 2004, President Bush has suffered one political misfire after another, prompting some Republicans to wonder anxiously when the White House political machine will get in gear.

    "This may have been the worst six weeks of Bush's political career," said Rick Davis, who managed the 2000 presidential bid by Arizona Republican Sen. John McCain which lost to Bush.

    In the latest embarrassment to hit the White House, the administration on Wednesday distanced itself from its own buoyant employment forecast that had predicted 2.6 million new jobs this year.

    That followed red faces over a statement by Gregory Mankiw, chairman of the White House Council of Economic Advisers, who described the process by which hundreds of thousands of U.S. jobs are migrating overseas as both natural and good.

    With many Americans extremely anxious over their job security, that statement seemed particularly callous and politically ill-judged.

    "For whatever reason, the White House has hit a rough patch and can't seem to get its political machinery in motion," said Keith Appell, a Republican political consultant.


    "They seemed to be caught by surprise by the force of the negative rhetoric that emerged from the Democratic presidential campaign and now they need to start scrambling to get their own message out," he said.

    Republicans say the U.S. media have focused on the contest among Democrats to find an opponent for Bush in the November election and have been dominated by the candidates' fierce criticism of Bush over Iraq, the economy and other issues.

    A CNN/Gallup/USA Today poll issued on Thursday showed the two top Democratic contenders with big leads over Bush. Massachusetts Sen. John Kerry, the front-runner, led Bush 55 to 43 percent among likely voters and North Carolina Sen. John Edwards was ahead 54 percent to 44 percent.

    Appell and other strategists say early year jitters may mean little for the election outcome. Many believe Bush, with a big advantage in campaign funds -- he has raised almost $150 million -- still has the upper hand going into the battle.

    Still, for a White House renowned for its political skills, the past six weeks have been sobering. The list of misfires is lengthy.



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    Mr. G

  • #2
    If it's the worst 6 weeks he has and some polls still show him winning?

    Sounds pretty tough for the competition.
    And, frankly, it has never occured to me that "winning" a debate is important, or that I should be hurt when someone like Airshark or kah, among others (for whom winning a pseudo debate or declaring intellectual superiority over invisible others is obviously very important) ridicule me.

    -The Artist formerly known as King in KC

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Damtoft@Feb 19 2004, 10:35 PM
      If it's the worst 6 weeks he has and some polls still show him winning?

      Sounds pretty tough for the competition.
      I think a lot of people are looking at the chinks in the armor more than they are the polls. It's early so nothing means a whole helluva lot. But, this line does hit the nail on the head:

      Still, for a White House renowned for its political skills, the past six weeks have been sobering. The list of misfires is lengthy.

      The administration has shot themselves in the foot quite a bit and that is totally unlike what we're used to seeing from them. We'll see what happens. It's a lllllllloooooonnnnnngggggg way to November.


      Mr. G

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      • #4
        Home plate umpire in tonight's Rangers-Tigers game is a big supporter of Bush.
        Here comes Cheveldaaaaaaaaae!!!!!!!!

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