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[Amazing video] The Fallen of World War II

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  • [Amazing video] The Fallen of World War II

    This video is 18 minutes long. It's 95% graphs. That's it.

    It's still one of the most moving things I've seen in a bit. Worth a look when you've got some time, and don't mind anyone seeing if you react emotionally to it.

    I like cheese.

  • #2
    Saw this on reddit a few days ago. Very well made. We've all heard the numbers, but seeing those numbers visualized is something else entirely.

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    • #3
      Seeing that Soviet bar go up is just stunning.

      Also never realized how much death there was in Yugoslavia during the war.
      I like cheese.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by triggercut1 View Post
        Seeing that Soviet bar go up is just stunning.

        Also never realized how much death there was in Yugoslavia during the war.
        Thanks so much for posting this. I just watched it and learned some things I didn't know about. It also added tons of perspective.

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        • #5
          ~70,000,000 in 6 yrs is roughly 32,000 per day, 22 per minute, every minute for six years. Astonishing really, and most of those were concentrated in the last 4 years.

          Watching those Eastern front numbers makes you wonder what sort of hell that must have been.
          25MM jobs in 10 years / 4% GDP Growth / Insurance for everybody / Schools flush with cash don't produce results
          Jan 2017: 4.7% U-3, 9.2% U-6, 62.7% LFPR, 5.2% Real Wages, 2.6% GDP, 19,827 DJIA, 2,271 S&P500, $2.316/gal

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          • #6
            Originally posted by marco View Post
            ~70,000,000 in 6 yrs is roughly 32,000 per day, 22 per minute, every minute for six years. Astonishing really, and most of those were concentrated in the last 4 years.

            Watching those Eastern front numbers makes you wonder what sort of hell that must have been.
            Someone quoted some horrific figure like a couple thousand a minute for a while for the Soviets at one point.

            That's just unfathomable.

            And I had no idea about the civilian casualties at Leningrad. 1.5m people without any food or supplies for 2 years?
            I like cheese.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by triggercut1 View Post
              Someone quoted some horrific figure like a couple thousand a minute for a while for the Soviets at one point.

              That's just unfathomable.
              It really is. Germany was going to lose but not without a horrific fight. That's what the Soviets got and then gave back.

              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rope-a-dope

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              • #8
                Originally posted by wildhorse View Post
                Thanks so much for posting this. I just watched it and learned some things I didn't know about. It also added tons of perspective.
                This many times over.

                It's staggering how civilians were sacrificed at such a high rate. The 200K killed by the Chinese when they blew out a dam to flood the land in order to stop the Japanese invasion is something I didn't know about until seeing this.
                Make America Great For Once.

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                • #9
                  That video was interesting and very well done, thanks for posting it. Without question the Eastern Front was the most brutal and to me one of the most fascinating theaters of the war. Still relatively obscure to most Americans. Prior to the mid 1990's there weren't many books available and those were almost all from the German perspective and using primarily German sources. Official Russian histories released prior to the 1990's contained a plethora of propaganda, distorted facts and figures and little verifiable documentation. Not until the Russians finally opened up their archives to historians and researchers in the 90's could an accurate account be put together. Well researched books, for the first time using both Russian and German sources, slowly began to be published in the mid 90's. Today there's lots of excellent resources available, highly recommended are any of David Glantz's books.

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