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MLB GDT: Week 8

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  • MLB GDT: Week 8

    It seems that the NL has closed the gap with the AL. Also, Tom Singer is a horrible writer.
    Official sponsor of the St. Louis Cardinals

    "This is a heavyweight bout indeed."--John Rooney, Oct. 27, 2011

  • #2
    The Yankees are 20-24 and dead last in the AL East.

    The Tigers are playing shitty again, are 17-27, and are dead last in the AL Central.

    The Cardinals, even after their recent poor play, have the third-best record in the NL.
    Official sponsor of the St. Louis Cardinals

    "This is a heavyweight bout indeed."--John Rooney, Oct. 27, 2011

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    • #3
      May 18 Houston manager Cecil Cooper said there was miscommunication about sending Astros ace Oswalt to pitch the seventh inning - which is when he left the game Saturday night with a hip injury against Texas.

      Advice: Oswalt said after Saturday's game he told coaches after the sixth that he didn't think he could pitch any longer, but he was sent out in the seventh anyway. The Astros ace reiterated those comments before Sunday's game against the Rangers. Cooper said he planned to meet with Oswalt. Oswalt said he's unsure about making his next scheduled start Thursday against Philadelphia.
      Official sponsor of the St. Louis Cardinals

      "This is a heavyweight bout indeed."--John Rooney, Oct. 27, 2011

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      • #4
        ARLINGTON -- Astros manager Cecil Cooper and ace right-hander Roy Oswalt diffused any potential controversy on Sunday from their conflicting comments following Saturday night's loss to Texas.

        Oswalt left Saturday's game in the seventh after giving up back-to-back singles to Ian Kinsler and Michael Young due to what was initially identified as a strained right groin. After the game, Cooper told reporters that Oswalt "said that he could go back out for the seventh. He was at 100 [or] 102 [pitches], and we thought we could get more out of him."

        Oswalt's version conflicted with Cooper's.

        "I came back to the dugout, and they asked me how I felt. I told them that was it and they wanted me to go one more, and I couldn't get through it," Oswalt said on Saturday. "I felt it in the sixth a little bit -- kind of a twinge a little bit, [but] they said go back out one more inning."

        Asked about the conflicting accounts on Sunday morning, both Cooper and Oswalt indicated it wasn't any big deal.

        "I think just the signal was wrong, a misunderstanding, but we're on top of it, so it's not an issue," Cooper said. "Just a misunderstanding. [It] didn't get communicated the right way, so we'll handle it. Actually, it's already been taken care of by those guys, but I need to talk to Roy to make sure we're all on the same page."

        Cooper typically lets pitching coach Dewey Robinson communicate with the pitching staff during games, citing Robinson's strong relationship with the pitchers and Cooper's desire to work through his coaches.

        "He'll translate to me what's happening, and we'll go from there," Cooper said.

        Oswalt hadn't talked to Robinson on Sunday morning and had no plans to talk with him or Cooper about the matter. When asked if he was comfortable with what happened on Saturday night, Oswalt said he was.

        "I haven't really even talked to Dewey this morning about it," Oswalt said.

        "I mean, I don't know -- he came to me in the seventh inning and asked me if I could go out there one more inning, and I thought I was pushing it a little. But I don't know, I haven't talked to anybody yet."

        Oswalt also said he doesn't believe his injury is a strained groin.

        "I don't know what it is. It's deeper than the one I had before in '03," Oswalt said. "It feels more like a bruise than anything. It doesn't feel muscular. [It] feels more like two bones hit together a little bit. Right now, it hurts a little bit, but we'll see how it feels. [In] two or three days, [I'll] throw a little bit and see how it feels, go from there."

        Oswalt doesn't believe it is a thigh problem, either.

        "I'm going to say it's more inner hip than anything," Oswalt said.

        (I'm still confused but it doesn't sound like it is a big deal from a player being pissed perspective. As for the injury we'll find out in a few days. I'm always worried about Oswalt and injuries. He has been a horse for the past 3 seasons but for a little guy he pitches a ton of innings. Everyone eventually breaks down)

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        • #5
          Useless stat: Carlos Zambrano has gone 160 ABs as a hitter without walking.

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          • #6
            At third base, Jones ranks among the best
            By Rob Neyer
            ESPN.com
            (Archive)
            Updated: May 16, 2008
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            First things first: Chipper Jones has been a truly fantastic hitter for many years, not even including this fantastic season. Among all the third basemen in major league history with at least 5,000 plate appearances, here are the top five in OPS+ (which accounts for ballparks and league scoring context)...

            NO. PLAYER OPS+
            1. Mike Schmidt 147
            2. Chipper Jones 143
            3. Eddie Mathews 143
            4. George Brett 135
            5. Home Run Baker 135


            Everyone on that list is already a Hall of Famer, except Chipper. Four other Hall of Famers are far, far behind these guys (granted, two of them -- George Kell and Freddie Lindstrom -- probably shouldn't be Hall of Famers).

            Of course, Chipper probably isn't going to retire with a 143 OPS+. As well as he's playing this season, he's likely to finish his career with some poor numbers, as nearly all players do. So his percentages will drop. However much they drop, his counting stats will only go up.

            With 397 home runs, Chipper is No. 4 on the all-time third baseman list and will probably pass No. 3 Darrell Evans (414) this summer.

            With 1,331 RBIs, Chipper is tied for No. 7 on the all-time list, but this summer he'll pass No. 4 Brooks Robinson (1,357). Barring injury, he'll pass No. 3 Mathews next season.

            With 1,325 runs scored, Chipper is No. 6 on the all-time list, and this summer he'll pass Evans at No. 5 (1,344).

            Two thoughts come to mind while looking at all these numbers. One, Darrell Evans is underappreciated. And two, Chipper Jones is even better than most of us think. By the end of this season, he's going to rank second or third in OPS+, third in home runs, fourth in RBIs and fifth in runs scored. He's done all this while spending all but two seasons of his career (so far) at third base. (By way of contrast, Evans played more than a thousand games as a first baseman or DH; similarly, Brett finished his career with seven seasons at first base and DH).

            I've been asked a few times, just in the past year or so, if Chipper Jones is a Hall of Famer. The fact that he's hitting .418 this season may have changed a lot of minds, but even before this season the question shouldn't have been whether or not Chipper's a Hall of Famer. Rather, the question should have been this: How many Hall of Fame third basemen couldn't carry Chipper's sweaty jock strap?

            Based on what we've seen, I'm going to guess the answer is "most of them." But let's check.

            According to the Hall of Fame, 13 third basemen have been enshrined. Three of them were Negro Leaguers, and I'm not smart enough to figure out how they compare to Chipper Jones. So that leaves 10, which is a small number; there are fewer Hall of Fame third basemen than any other position.

            Where does Chipper fit? Trust me: He's better than George Kell and Freddie Lindstrom. That leaves Schmidt, Mathews, Brett, Baker, Wade Boggs, Jimmy Collins, Brooks Robinson and Pie Traynor.

            Collins is now forgotten because he played around the turn of the (previous) century and wasn't memorialized with a great nickname or a chapter in "The Glory of Their Times". But Collins was a fine hitter and an astonishing fielder during an era in which third basemen were expected to make a huge defensive contribution. In fact, until around 1930 third basemen were expected to make a larger defensive contribution than second basemen. Which makes comparing "modern" third basemen to pre-1930 third basemen difficult. And that pre-1930 era includes Frank "Home Run" Baker and Pie Traynor (who was generally considered baseball's greatest third baseman until Mike Schmidt came along).

            So let's focus on the guys we know: Messrs. Schmidt, Mathews, Brett, Boggs and Robinson. All of them are Hall of Famers, and some might argue that they're the five greatest third basemen. Does Mr. Jones really have a shot at joining that club?

            You bet. It's not hard to put together one of those bogus comp lists for Chipper. Or rather, it won't be hard in two or three years. He'll soon have more hits than Mike Schmidt, more homers than George Brett, more RBIs than Brooks Robinson and more runs scored than Eddie Mathews.

            But is he better than any of those guys, really? Not yet. One thing we haven't mentioned is Chipper's defense, and whether you're looking at Total Baseball's Fielding Runs, or Bill James' Win Shares, or Baseball Prospectus' Fielding Runs Above Average, the evidence suggests that he's been a subpar fielder. You've seen the hitting stats, and he's obviously among the best-hitting third basemen ever. But defense counts, too.

            Here are the top eight third basemen according to win shares (which includes defense):

            NO. PLAYER WS
            1. Mike Schmidt 467
            2. Eddie Matthews 450
            3. George Brett 432
            4. Wade Boggs 394
            5. Darrell Evans 363
            6. Brooks Robinson 356
            7. Chipper Jones 334
            8. Ron Santo 324



            Chipper is 36 years old, and he has averaged 22 win shares over the past three seasons. If he stays healthy this season, he might catch Robinson ... but probably won't until next year. He might catch Boggs in three or four years ... but then again, he might not. And Brett is probably out of reach.

            Of course, that's setting the bar pretty high. You don't have to be George Brett to get into the Hall of Fame. You don't have to be Wade Boggs or Brooks Robinson, either. But you never know, right? There's Darrell Evans again, fifth on this list but frozen out of Cooperstown. So while Chipper probably shouldn't need to do anything else, two or three more good seasons should actually help him. You might think Jones has done plenty already ... but that's what every Cubs fan thinks about Ron Santo, and he's still waiting.
            Official sponsor of the St. Louis Cardinals

            "This is a heavyweight bout indeed."--John Rooney, Oct. 27, 2011

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            • #7
              WAAAAAAY too early to be talking "very real chance at a triple crown", ESPN....

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              • #8
                What a frustrating way to give up 3 runs. A 12 pitch AB to Ramirez that ends in a seeing eye single between third and short. An almost as long AB to the Cub's Chinaman that ends up in a walk after some close pitches. Home Run.

                That was almost as bad as having to listen to Steve Philips.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by Sheriff Blaylock View Post
                  What a frustrating way to give up 3 runs. A 12 pitch AB to Ramirez that ends in a seeing eye single between third and short. An almost as long AB to the Cub's Chinaman that ends up in a walk after some close pitches. Home Run.

                  That was almost as bad as having to listen to Steve Philips.
                  That was wacky. Inside the park homer on a ball that was clearly over the yellow line. No idea what Bourn was doing out there, but I'm glad Geo was hustling to make the ump's call moot.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by bcruise View Post
                    That was wacky. Inside the park homer on a ball that was clearly over the yellow line. No idea what Bourn was doing out there, but I'm glad Geo was hustling to make the ump's call moot.
                    I think Bourn knew it was a home run. He just assumed the umpire was going to call it.
                    Make America Great For Once.

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                    • #11
                      50 year old Edmonds still easing into over the shoulder catches.

                      3-1. Per Steve hitters get better the second and third times through.

                      Speaking of Steve do they really have to have a 3 man booth.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Sheriff Blaylock View Post
                        50 year old Edmonds still easing into over the shoulder catches.

                        3-1. Per Steve hitters get better the second and third times through.

                        Speaking of Steve do they really have to have a 3 man booth.
                        You're local, dammit! Mute your TV and tune into the radio broadcast.
                        Official sponsor of the St. Louis Cardinals

                        "This is a heavyweight bout indeed."--John Rooney, Oct. 27, 2011

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by kah View Post
                          You're local, dammit! Mute your TV and tune into the radio broadcast.
                          +++

                          Listen to Milo!
                          Make America Great For Once.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by kah View Post
                            You're local, dammit! Mute your TV and tune into the radio broadcast.
                            too much effort. i would rather complain. plus milo is worse.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Sheriff Blaylock View Post
                              too much effort. i would rather complain. plus milo is worse.
                              Is he really that bad now?

                              I used to really love his calls up through the mid 90's.
                              Make America Great For Once.

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