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fact checking on McCain--veteran's health care

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  • fact checking on McCain--veteran's health care

    Certainly not an unbiased source of information---still---it is independent of hillary or obama for now. I tried it out---on a narrow subset of McCain's position, or lack of one on healthcare. I took a look at his attitude towards Veteran's Health Care. After all, he is seeking to become the commander in chief---of people who will eventually become veterans.


    Progressive Media U.S.A., the third-party pro-Dem group that has vowed to raise $40 million to target McCain in advance of the general election, is already feeling the influence of its new leader, Media Matters' David Brock.
    The group has just launched a new McCain "fact check" site called McCainSource.com whose goal is to keep the press' coverage of McCain on the up and up.
    Fact-check sites that are essentially appendages of campaigns have been all the rage in this election, but this one could prove a useful resource. Take a look.
    Veterans Health Care

    McCain Voted Against Veteran’s Health Care At Least SIX Times. [SCR 18, Vote #55, 3/16/05][SCR 95, Vote #40, 3/10/04][S1689, Vote #379, 10/14/03][SCR 23, Vote #81, 3/25/03][SCR 23, Vote #74, 3/21/03][S 936, Vote #168, 7/10/97]
    • McCain Voted Against Increasing Veterans’ Health Care By $2.8 Billion. In 2005, McCain voted against an amendment that would have increased funding for veterans’ health care by $2.8 billion for fiscal 2006 and reduced the deficit by $2.8 billion. The amendment failed 47-53. [SCR 18, Vote #55, 3/16/05]
    • McCain Voted Against $1.8 Billion In Veterans Health Care Funding. In 2004, McCain voted against an amendment that would create a reserve fund to allow for an increase in veterans medical care by $1.8 billion. The amendment failed 46-51. [SCR 95, Vote #40, 3/10/04]
    • McCain Voted Against Increasing Funding For Veterans Health Programs By $1.8 Billion. In 2003, McCainvoted against an amendment that would reduce the amount provided for Iraqi reconstruction by $5.03 billion, and redirect that funding for domestic programs, including $1.8 billion for veterans’ health benefits. The motion to table the amendment passed 59-35. [S1689, Vote #379, 10/14/03]
    • McCain Voted Against Increasing Veterans’ Health Care Funding By $20.3 Billion. In 2003, McCain voted against increasing spending on the veterans’ health care program TRICARE by $20.3 billion over 10 years to give members of the National Guard and Reserves and their families greater access to the health care program. The amendment failed 46-51. [SCR 23, Vote #81, 3/25/03]
    • McCain Voted Against Increasing Funding For Veterans Programs By $1 Billion. In 2003, McCain voted against increasing spending on veterans’ programs by approximately $1 billion and putting the same amount toward deficit reduction. The amount would be offset by a reduction in tax cuts. The amendment failed 49-51. [SCR 23, Vote #74, 3/21/03]
    • McCain Voted Against Shifting Funds To Provide Improved Veterans’ Health Benefits. In 1997, McCain voted to table an amendment that would require the Defense secretary to transfer $400 million to the secretary of Veteran’s Affairs in fiscal 1998 for veteran’s benefits. The motion to table passed 58-41. [S 936, Vote #168, 7/10/97]
    v



  • #2
    veterans stuff was pretty dull---I liked this better...
    This from an interview as recently as 2005:
    When asked specifically if he thought the U.S. military should set up shop in Iraq along the lines of what has been established in post-WWII Germany or Japan -- something McCain has repeatedly advocated during the campaign -- the senator offered nothing short of a categorical "no."
    "I would hope that we could bring them all home," he said on MSNBC. "I would hope that we would probably leave some military advisers, as we have in other countries, to help them with their training and equipment and that kind of stuff."
    Host Chris Matthews pressed McCain on the issue.
    "You've heard the ideological argument to keep U.S. forces in the Middle East. I've heard it from the hawks. They say, keep United States military presence in the Middle East, like we have with the 7th Fleet in Asia. We have the German...the South Korean component. Do you think we could get along without it?"
    McCain held fast, rejecting the very policy he urges today. "I not only think we could get along without it, but I think one of our big problems has been the fact that many Iraqis resent American military presence," he responded. "And I don't pretend to know exactly Iraqi public opinion. But as soon as we can reduce our visibility as much as possible, the better I think it is going to be."
    This is the reason his 100-years comment is a completely legitimate issue.
    v


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    • #3
      Nutso.

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