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Navy SEAL receives Medal of Honor

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  • Navy SEAL receives Medal of Honor

    Medal of Honor going to Iraq hero
    ‘He never took his eye off the grenade,’ attack survivor says of his heroism
    The Associated Press
    updated 1:57 p.m. PT, Mon., March. 31, 2008
    SAN DIEGO - An elite Navy SEAL who threw himself on top of a grenade in Iraq to save his comrades will be posthumously awarded the nation's highest military tribute, a White House spokeswoman said Monday.

    The Medal of Honor will be awarded to Petty Officer 2nd Class Michael A. Monsoor. His family will receive the medal during a White House ceremony April 8.

    Monsoor is the fifth person to receive the honor since the beginning of the Iraq and Afghanistan wars.

    "Petty Officer Monsoor distinguished himself by extraordinary heroism on Sept. 29, 2006," press secretary Dana Perino told reporters during a briefing aboard Air Force One as President Bush headed to Europe for a NATO summit.

    Monsoor was part of a sniper security team in Ramadi with three other SEALs and eight Iraqi soldiers, according to a Navy account. An insurgent fighter threw the grenade, which struck Monsoor in the chest before falling in front of him.

    Monsoor then threw himself on the grenade, according to a SEAL who spoke to The Associated Press in 2006 on condition of anonymity because his work requires his identity to remain secret.

    'We owe him'
    "He never took his eye off the grenade, his only movement was down toward it," said a 28-year-old lieutenant, who suffered shrapnel wounds to both legs that day. "He undoubtedly saved mine and the other SEALs' lives, and we owe him."

    Two SEALs next to Monsoor were injured; another who was 10 feet to 15 feet from the blast was unhurt. Monsoor, from Garden Grove, Calif., was 25 at the time.

    Monsoor, a platoon machine gunner, had received the Silver Star, the third-highest award for combat valor, for his actions pulling a wounded SEAL to safety during a May 9, 2006, firefight in Ramadi.

    He was posthumously awarded the Bronze Star for his sacrifice in Ramadi.

    Sixteen SEALs have been killed in Afghanistan. Eleven of them died in June 2005 when a helicopter was shot down near the Pakistan border while ferrying reinforcements for troops pursuing al-Qaida militants.

    There are about 2,300 of the elite fighters, based in Coronado and Little Creek, Va.

    The Navy is trying to boost the number by 500 — a challenge considering more than 75 percent of candidates drop out of training, notorious for "Hell Week," five days of continual drills by the ocean broken by only four hours sleep total.

    Monsoor made it through training on his second attempt.

    © 2008 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.

    URL: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/23886008/

  • #2
    Seriously.....how does something like this go unnoticed while other threads full of total bullshit get 1000 replies....? (not just here)

    RIP bro

    Comment


    • #3
      honor and duty...seems this guy lived it.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Legionarivs XIII View Post
        Seriously.....how does something like this go unnoticed while other threads full of total bullshit get 1000 replies....? (not just here)

        RIP bro
        Didn't go unnoticed. I read it all. But I don't know what we should say. I'm glad to learn about this guy, and I'm sorry for his family. Sounds like he certainly deserves the honors he received.

        Moon

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Moon Man View Post
          Didn't go unnoticed. I read it all. But I don't know what we should say.
          Gotcha....

          I posted this because I guess it's the least I could do to remember the man for his sacrifice regardless of the feeling on the conflict they were invloved in -

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Moon Man View Post
            Didn't go unnoticed. I read it all. But I don't know what we should say. I'm glad to learn about this guy, and I'm sorry for his family. Sounds like he certainly deserves the honors he received.

            Moon
            ++

            It pisses me off to hear guys like this being killed for nothing. What else can be said? RIP
            Official sponsor of Mike Shannon's Retirement Party

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Legionarivs XIII View Post
              Gotcha....

              I posted this because I guess it's the least I could do to remember the man for his sacrifice regardless of the feeling on the conflict they were invloved in -
              Thank you for sharing.
              Feb. 08, 2005
              Lois Lane: What's the general opinion of a gal asking the guy out?

              Forever
              Lounge sponsor of YYZ and his Mardi Gras crew.
              Originally posted by Airshark
              NSane has already won - because the Sharks are well and truly ef'ed.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by ElviswasaBluesFan View Post
                ++

                It pisses me off to hear guys like this being killed for nothing. What else can be said? RIP
                He didn't die for nothing. He died saving his buddies but I get where you are coming from and agree.

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                • #9


                  Would'nt instinct tell you to run like hell?
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                  • #10
                    Lt. j.g. Madeline Swegle - the Navy's first black female fighter pilot.


                    From this day forward, I no longer shall tinker with the machinery of death.

                    For more than 20 years I have endeavored-indeed, I have struggled-along with a majority of this Court, to develop procedural & substantive rules that would lend more than the mere appearance of fairness to the death penalty endeavor.


                    I feel morally and intellectually obligated simply to concede that the death penalty experiment has failed.

                    The path the Court has chosen lessens us all. I dissent.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Which reminds me that the son of a friend of mine recently earned his wings as a Naval fighter pilot.

                      He was deathly afraid that his call sign would be Wendy, since he used to work there. He was spared. They gave him Frosty instead.
                      From this day forward, I no longer shall tinker with the machinery of death.

                      For more than 20 years I have endeavored-indeed, I have struggled-along with a majority of this Court, to develop procedural & substantive rules that would lend more than the mere appearance of fairness to the death penalty endeavor.


                      I feel morally and intellectually obligated simply to concede that the death penalty experiment has failed.

                      The path the Court has chosen lessens us all. I dissent.

                      Comment

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