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  • If all my worldly possessions ever catch fire...

    ...and I am able to save only one thing, it might be the Drive Like Jehu s/t CD.

    This band is amazing. This is the music I want playing at my fucking funeral.
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  • #2
    I thought you were going to say your Brett Favre pajamas.
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    • #3
      Originally posted by Blues Fan in SF View Post
      ...and I am able to save only one thing, it might be the Drive Like Jehu s/t CD.

      This band is amazing. This is the music I want playing at my fucking funeral.
      Hrmmm, seems like I read this somewhere before. Did you post this on every fouram?

      LOL.

      email me the mp3's, [email protected]. I'll let you know if it's good or not.


      "Sometimes you score, sometimes you don't," Tarasenko said. "You can't score every game. So, at the same time, you need to help your team. You can be a factor. That's what I try to do. I believe it's coming if you just don't think about it".

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Can Of Corn View Post
        I thought you were going to say your Brett Favre pajamas.
        You obviously have me confused with someone else
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        • #5
          Originally posted by _Gassoff View Post
          Hrmmm, seems like I read this somewhere before. Did you post this on every fouram?

          LOL.

          email me the mp3's, [email protected]. I'll let you know if it's good or not.


          I've probably posted this before, actually. I've been trying to move on from this CD for 16 years - can't do it.

          I'm uploading it now - I'll send you a link once it's ready...be warned: it's not for everybody
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          • #6
            Originally posted by Blues Fan in SF View Post


            I've probably posted this before, actually. I've been trying to move on from this CD for 16 years - can't do it.

            I'm uploading it now - I'll send you a link once it's ready...be warned: it's not for everybody
            If there are heavy guitars, it's for me.

            If it's electronia, rap, or country, it isn't for me.


            "Sometimes you score, sometimes you don't," Tarasenko said. "You can't score every game. So, at the same time, you need to help your team. You can be a factor. That's what I try to do. I believe it's coming if you just don't think about it".

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            • #7
              Originally posted by _Gassoff View Post
              If there are heavy guitars, it's for me.

              If it's electronia, rap, or country, it isn't for me.
              It's some of the most intense shit you'll ever hear. And a truly unique sound that no one I've ever heard since has managed to duplicate (although many have tried)...

              I would have died after seeing this band live. It had to be incredible...my #1 regret probably is missing them when I was in grad school at Illinois and they were in town for a show...ended up staying late in lab and missed it...

              They broke up shortly after that show (on that tour, actually, if I remember correctly), and that was it...one of the guys (John Reis, guitarist) might be better known as the frontman of Rocket From The Crypt...he and the other guitarist from Jehu (Rick Froberg) reunited briefly with the drummer from Delta '72 to form a band called Hot Snakes - they broke up a couple years ago, though, too...

              Anyway, here's the link to the s/t CD by Drive Like Jehu, released by Headhunter Records in San Diego in 1991, and the singularly most influential music album I have ever heard...the record that got me into playing guitar and ultimately led me to seeking and landing a job at the campus radio station at University of Missouri-Rolla in 1991...

              http://www.mediafire.com/?ff9bfy0ustd
              Last edited by Blues Fan in TX; 03-29-2008, 12:47 AM.
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              • #8
                Thanks BFiSF. I gave it a listen. I love hearing new (to me) music. Not bad, but then again, it's not my thing.

                The rhythm guitar parts, while powerful and loud, are very simple. Then again, simple can be effective, just ask Tom Petty and The Heartbreakers. I enjoyed the guitar work almost as much as I hated the singing. Or more like screaming.... I couldn't get much in the way of lyrics out of what I was hearing.

                My favorites were Caress, and Future Home Of Stucco Monstrosity. I could listen to those songs. I dug the bass opening in O Pencil Sharp, but it kind of fell into the same rhythm as Atom Jack before long.

                I found Good Luck In Jail and Turn It Off to both be rather irritating. Some of the strange noises were not pleasant to the ear at all.

                All that said, I'm a 45 year old man, and perhaps this music was designed to irritate my ilk.

                With a singer, mixing the rhythm guitars a little more in the background, and adding a lead guitar or perhaps a keyboard, they could have had something.



                "Sometimes you score, sometimes you don't," Tarasenko said. "You can't score every game. So, at the same time, you need to help your team. You can be a factor. That's what I try to do. I believe it's coming if you just don't think about it".

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by _Gassoff View Post
                  Thanks BFiSF. I gave it a listen. I love hearing new (to me) music. Not bad, but then again, it's not my thing.

                  The rhythm guitar parts, while powerful and loud, are very simple. Then again, simple can be effective, just ask Tom Petty and The Heartbreakers. I enjoyed the guitar work almost as much as I hated the singing. Or more like screaming.... I couldn't get much in the way of lyrics out of what I was hearing.

                  My favorites were Caress, and Future Home Of Stucco Monstrosity. I could listen to those songs. I dug the bass opening in O Pencil Sharp, but it kind of fell into the same rhythm as Atom Jack before long.

                  I found Good Luck In Jail and Turn It Off to both be rather irritating. Some of the strange noises were not pleasant to the ear at all.

                  All that said, I'm a 45 year old man, and perhaps this music was designed to irritate my ilk.

                  With a singer, mixing the rhythm guitars a little more in the background, and adding a lead guitar or perhaps a keyboard, they could have had something.



                  At least you gave it a shot - way too many people have dismissed it without even listening to it...

                  BTW - "Good Luck In Jail" is my favorite song on that album - like I said, definitely not for everyone...

                  Cheers! You still pwn me in the legendary Lounge thread
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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Blues Fan in SF View Post


                    At least you gave it a shot - way too many people have dismissed it without even listening to it...

                    BTW - "Good Luck In Jail" is my favorite song on that album - like I said, definitely not for everyone...

                    Cheers! You still pwn me in the legendary Lounge thread
                    I'm always ready to hear music. If I had to chose between Drive Like Jehu and The Judds, I'd pick Drive Like Jehu.

                    And, it's not the fact that the music is heavy that gets me on this one, I like heavy music. My biggest criticism is the lack of singing, and the insertion of strange noises.


                    "Sometimes you score, sometimes you don't," Tarasenko said. "You can't score every game. So, at the same time, you need to help your team. You can be a factor. That's what I try to do. I believe it's coming if you just don't think about it".

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Blues Fan in SF View Post
                      Cheers! You still pwn me in the legendary Lounge thread
                      Yes, but that because listing to music is what I do with my free time. I don't watch much television, and when I do, it's things I have DVR'd, or sports events.

                      The music on my computer is playing via Winamp 24/7. I have an FM transmitter hooked up, and radio's in my bedroom, my kitchen, my bathroom, The back porch, and in the living room. I can pick up my mp3's in all those rooms, and in my car for about four houses.

                      So basically, when I am on line, I'm listening to music, and posting it is rather easy.


                      "Sometimes you score, sometimes you don't," Tarasenko said. "You can't score every game. So, at the same time, you need to help your team. You can be a factor. That's what I try to do. I believe it's coming if you just don't think about it".

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by _Gassoff View Post
                        I'm always ready to hear music. If I had to chose between Drive Like Jehu and The Judds, I'd pick Drive Like Jehu.

                        And, it's not the fact that the music is heavy that gets me on this one, I like heavy music. My biggest criticism is the lack of singing, and the insertion of strange noises.
                        It's strange - but I love that "style" of singing (or lack thereof)...and the strange noises are actually a side-effect of the guitar's alternate tunings (they were heavily influenced by Sonic Youth and Fugazi, believe it or not)...

                        But yeah, his vocals kill it for just about everyone I've ever tried to turn on to this band - so you're in good company, at least

                        Your turn. Introduce me to something you like I've never heard...
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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Blues Fan in SF View Post
                          It's strange - but I love that "style" of singing (or lack thereof)...and the strange noises are actually a side-effect of the guitar's alternate tunings (they were heavily influenced by Sonic Youth and Fugazi, believe it or not)...

                          But yeah, his vocals kill it for just about everyone I've ever tried to turn on to this band - so you're in good company, at least

                          Your turn. Introduce me to something you like I've never heard...
                          I'm going to turn you on to some String Driven Thing.

                          Uploading now.....


                          "Sometimes you score, sometimes you don't," Tarasenko said. "You can't score every game. So, at the same time, you need to help your team. You can be a factor. That's what I try to do. I believe it's coming if you just don't think about it".

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by _Gassoff View Post
                            I'm going to turn you on to some String Driven Thing.

                            Uploading now.....
                            Yes! I remember this band from college, actually - I don't have it anymore, but I remember I was way into it back then...
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                            • #15
                              From Stringdriventhing.com
                              One of the finest bands signed to the Charisma label during its early-'70s heyday, Scotland's String Driven Thing originally formed as a trio in 1969, led by the husband-and-wife team of Chris and Pauline Adams, plus percussionist John Mannion. Locally popular at the tail end of the 1960s, the band faded from view shortly after releasing a self-titled debut album in 1970. They continued playing, however, with the lineup expanding to include bassist Colin Wilson


                              In early 1972, Chris Adams journeyed to London, hoping to interest the Strawbs' management with a three-song demo. Finding himself with some free time, he was flicking through the record labels section of the Yellow Pages when he spotted Stratton Smith Enterprises. He called and found himself in conversation with the head of Charisma chief Tony Stratton Smith's publishing company, Mooncrest Music. Within a week, Stratton Smith himself was in Glasgow, for a String Driven Thing showcase at the Burns' Howff pub; a week after that, the band signed with his label.

                              Shedding Mannion around the same time, the group returned to Glasgow with a princely retainer of 20 pounds per week, to rehearse. A month later, they went back south for their first ever live shows as a "signed" band: a community hall in the town of Tunbridge Wells, where Strat had his country retreat, and the 1972 Reading Festival. It was an audacious entry, but it worked and the group quickly set to work on its first Charisma album, to be titled — like its independent predecessor — String Driven Thing.

                              Recorded in two weeks in August 1972 with producer Shel Talmy, the album landed rave reviews across the music press, with Melody Maker in particular leaping onto the group's side. (Amusingly, it later transpired that the album's distinctive gatefold sleeve, designed by Po of Hipgnosis, cost more than the actual recording sessions!)

                              The band continued pushing forward. Visiting France, they stopped by the renowned Chateau D'Heuroville studios (the Honky Chateau of Elton John fame), where they were filmed recording some songs with a French producer, who later claimed he'd done a better job than Shel Talmy ("he had a point," mused Adams); December 1972, meanwhile, saw the band fly to New York to support Genesis at that band's first ever American show, at the Philharmonic Hall.



                              String Driven Thing's rise ought to have been inexorable. Their latest single, "Circus," was making waves on both sides of the Atlantic, and plans were afoot for the group to join Genesis on their own latest tours of both Britain and the U.S. Unfortunately, the beginning of 1973 saw Chris Adams hospitalized with a collapsed lung, an event that was to have a serious impact on String Driven Thing's future.

                              That experience, and the nightmare of the next week's worth of agonizing recuperation was to form the inspiration for much of The Machine That Cried, String Driven Thing's next album. However, although the band did make it onto the British dates, the American shows never happened; instead, the band found itself shunting up and down the British highway system, playing small clubs and universities, and breaking in the new material.

                              The group's management at this time was being handled by Charisma's own in-house team, a less than satisfactory arrangement, but one that Stratton Smith seemed unwilling to change. Indeed, when Adams approached him to speak of the group's "total lack of confidence" in the setup, he simply "hummed and hawed and did nothing." Neither was that the end of the group's travails. In conversation with another label staffer one day, Adams mentioned that the band was considering adding a drummer to the lineup. A few days later, Stratton Smith showed up at a concert in Oxford, and instead offered them a keyboard player, Robert John Godfrey. He survived a week of rehearsals, but just one show, at the London Roundhouse, before the band declared him unsuitable and brought in a drummer (fellow Glaswegian Billy Fairley) after all. Godfrey went on to his own solo career at Charisma.

                              In this form, String Driven Thing returned to the studio to record The Machine That Cried, alongside what remains their best-known number, the single "It's a Game." The LP has since been acclaimed not merely String Driven Thing's masterpiece, but one of the finest progressive rock albums of the entire era — its CD reissue on the British Ozit label was widely heralded as among the most intelligent re-releases of recent years, and the excitement that greeted the re-formed String Driven Thing's return to action hailed almost wholly from memories of this marvelous album. At the time, however, all seemed doom-laden. "It's a Game," although it received plenty of British airplay, went nowhere (although a hit Bay City Rollers cover later went some way toward making amends); The Machine That Cried simply died and, by the end of the year, String Driven Thing looked to have followed it, as both the Adams and Colin Wilson walked out. Stratton Smith alone was left to carry the flag, rebuilding the group around himself and newfound vocalist Kim Beacon, and soldiering on until 1975. The two albums that followed both have their place in the prog rock pantheon, but the magic had gone from the band.

                              It returned in the early '90s, as the Adams returned to the helm, overseeing both reissues of the band's original albums, and the preparation of new material and concerts.


                              "Sometimes you score, sometimes you don't," Tarasenko said. "You can't score every game. So, at the same time, you need to help your team. You can be a factor. That's what I try to do. I believe it's coming if you just don't think about it".

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