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Woman loses job over photo of flag-draped coffins

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  • Woman loses job over photo of flag-draped coffins

    A military contractor has fired Tami Silicio, a Kuwait-based cargo worker whose photograph of flag-draped coffins of fallen U.S. soldiers was published in Sunday's edition of The Seattle Times.

    Silicio was let go yesterday for violating U.S. government and company regulations, said William Silva, president of Maytag Aircraft, the contractor that employed Silicio at Kuwait International Airport.

    "I feel like I was hit in the chest with a steel bar and got my wind knocked out. I have to admit I liked my job, and I liked what I did," Silicio said.

    Her photograph, taken earlier this month, shows more than 20 flag-draped coffins in a cargo plane about to depart from Kuwait. Since 1991, the Pentagon has banned the media from taking pictures of caskets being returned to the United States.


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    Mr. G

  • #2

    Her photograph, taken earlier this month, shows more than 20 flag-draped coffins in a cargo plane about to depart from Kuwait. Since 1991, the Pentagon has banned the media from taking pictures of caskets being returned to the United States.
    The Bush administration - they hate freedom.
    Dude. Can. Fly.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by dvyyyyyy@Apr 22 2004, 08:42 AM

      Her photograph, taken earlier this month, shows more than 20 flag-draped coffins in a cargo plane about to depart from Kuwait. Since 1991, the Pentagon has banned the media from taking pictures of caskets being returned to the United States.
      The Bush administration - they hate freedom.
      Dvyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyyy yyyyyyyyyyyy,

      This executive order wasn't rescinded by Clinton, either.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by dvyyyyyy@Apr 22 2004, 08:42 AM

        Her photograph, taken earlier this month, shows more than 20 flag-draped coffins in a cargo plane about to depart from Kuwait. Since 1991, the Pentagon has banned the media from taking pictures of caskets being returned to the United States.
        The Bush administration - they hate freedom.
        I guess the Clinton administration didn't see fit to remove the ban, huh?


        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by dvyyyyyy@Apr 22 2004, 08:42 AM

          Her photograph, taken earlier this month, shows more than 20 flag-draped coffins in a cargo plane about to depart from Kuwait. Since 1991, the Pentagon has banned the media from taking pictures of caskets being returned to the United States.
          The Bush administration - they hate freedom.
          Wait. Weren't some arguing this was not a case censorship?

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Mr. Goalie@Apr 22 2004, 08:34 AM
            A military contractor has fired Tami Silicio, a Kuwait-based cargo worker whose photograph of flag-draped coffins of fallen U.S. soldiers was published in Sunday's edition of The Seattle Times.

            Silicio was let go yesterday for violating U.S. government and company regulations, said William Silva, president of Maytag Aircraft, the contractor that employed Silicio at Kuwait International Airport.

            "I feel like I was hit in the chest with a steel bar and got my wind knocked out. I have to admit I liked my job, and I liked what I did," Silicio said.

            Her photograph, taken earlier this month, shows more than 20 flag-draped coffins in a cargo plane about to depart from Kuwait. Since 1991, the Pentagon has banned the media from taking pictures of caskets being returned to the United States.


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            Mr. G
            See what I mean ? But to some, that can't be possible !?!?!

            Comment


            • #7
              >>This executive order wasn't rescinded by Clinton, either.<<

              Blame Clinton.
              Norman Chad, syndicated columnist: “Sports radio, reflecting our sinking culture, spends entire days advising managers and coaches, berating managers and coaches, firing managers and coaches and searching the countryside for better middle relievers. If they just redirected their energy toward, say, crosswalk-signal maintenance, America would be 2 percent more livable.”

              "The best argument against democracy," someone (Churchill?) said, "is a five minute conversation with the average voter."

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by dvyyyyyy@Apr 22 2004, 08:42 AM

                The Bush administration - they hate freedom.
                ...specifically, it appears, freedom of speech.
                "Let me lay it right on the line. Bigotry and racism are among the deadliest social ills plaguing the world today. The only way to destroy them is to expose them. If man is ever to be worthy of his destiny, we must fill our hearts with tolerance.- Stan Lee (circa 1968)

                "Compete less with the person in front of you than the person inside of you." - Anonymous

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by slow groove+Apr 22 2004, 09:56 AM-->
                  QUOTE (slow groove @ Apr 22 2004, 09:56 AM)

                • #10
                  Originally posted by jhanke+Apr 22 2004, 11:19 AM-->
                  QUOTE (jhanke @ Apr 22 2004, 11:19 AM)
                  Originally posted by slow [email protected] 22 2004, 09:56 AM

                • #11
                  Originally posted by Iowa_Card+Apr 22 2004, 11:27 AM-->
                  QUOTE (Iowa_Card @ Apr 22 2004, 11:27 AM)
                  Originally posted by [email protected] 22 2004, 11:19 AM
                  Originally posted by slow [email protected] 22 2004, 09:56 AM

                • #12
                  Only pictures of smiling GIs and Iraqis, welcoming their liberators, will be allowed.
                  From this day forward, I no longer shall tinker with the machinery of death.

                  For more than 20 years I have endeavored-indeed, I have struggled-along with a majority of this Court, to develop procedural & substantive rules that would lend more than the mere appearance of fairness to the death penalty endeavor.


                  I feel morally and intellectually obligated simply to concede that the death penalty experiment has failed.

                  The path the Court has chosen lessens us all. I dissent.

                  Comment


                  • #13
                    Originally posted by Iowa_Card+Apr 22 2004, 08:43 AM-->
                    QUOTE (Iowa_Card @ Apr 22 2004, 08:43 AM)

                  • #14
                    Originally posted by Moe_Szyslak@Apr 22 2004, 07:35 PM
                    Iowa...GHWB ran the Pentagon in 91 and there were NO/ZERO US combat casualties in the NATO operation in Kosovo.
                    that's not true. According to Jack Bauer, the eliminated many people, including the loss of some of his and President Palmer's team.


                    sorry, just watched 24 again and couldn't resist.
                    Sponsor of Adam Wainwright
                    Sponsor of the $0.50 any-size frozen coke at Mobil on the Run when the Cards score six
                    There are 24 teams in baseball with a longer World Series drought than the St. Louis Cardinals.
                    "I told myself from the beginning, 'If he's going to throw a shutout, then he's going to tie,' ... he was not going to beat me today." ---Adam Wainwright, 8/11/10
                    "I was confused." ---Tim McCarver, 7/30/15

                    Comment


                    • #15

                      Photos of Soldiers' Coffins Revive Controversy

                      By Blaine Harden and Dana Milbank
                      Washington Post Staff Writers
                      Friday, April 23, 2004; Page A10


                      The Pentagon lost its tight control over the images of coffins returning from Iraq as about 350 such images were released under the Freedom of Information Act and a Seattle newspaper published a similar photo taken by a military contractor.



                      After Dover Air Force Base, the main port for returning remains, released hundreds of government photos of the ceremonies, the Defense Department ordered yesterday that no more photographs be released. In addition, two employees for defense contractor Maytag Aircraft were fired after the Pentagon complained about a photo of flag-draped caskets taken by one of them that appeared in the Seattle Times.

                      In March 2003, on the eve of war in Iraq, the Pentagon ordered an end to all media coverage of ceremonies for the returning remains of soldiers killed overseas. Although Dover already had such a policy, the Pentagon action enforced a military-wide ban on images of flag-draped caskets that dated to late 2000 but had not been followed.

                      With few exceptions, the ban had remained in force until recent days. But last week, about 350 photos from Dover were released under a Freedom of Information Act request by Russ Kick, a First Amendment advocate who runs a Web site called the Memory Hole (www.thememoryhole.org). Dover recommended that Kick's request be denied, but officials at Air Mobility Command headquarters at Scott Air Force Base in Illinois authorized the release on appeal. After Kick posted the photos, they appeared on other Web sites, including the Drudge Report.

                      The sudden spread yesterday of the Dover photos of flag-draped caskets returning from Iraq came a day after Tami Silicio and her husband and co-worker, David Landry, were fired for the photo she took at Kuwait International Airport of caskets in an aircraft. The photo was published Sunday on the front page of the Seattle Times.

                      "We have terminated two employees in Kuwait who violated Department of Defense and company policy by working together to photograph and publish the flag-draped caskets of our servicemen and women being returned to the United States," said William Silva, president of Maytag Aircraft, the Colorado Springs-based military contractor that employed Silicio and her husband.

                      According to the Times, Silva said the firing decision was made by the company but the military had "very specific concerns" about the photo. The Pentagon has said that only individual graveside services give the full context of a soldier's sacrifice.

                      Silicio, a cargo worker who often loaded coffins on military planes bound for the United States, shot the photo in early April, as twin uprisings in Iraq led to a spike in American war dead. She snapped a digital photograph of an aircraft packed with caskets and told her best friend that her photograph of coffins of U.S. soldiers killed in Iraq would allow parents of the dead to see that "their children weren't thrown around like a piece of cargo."

                      Losing her well-paid job in Kuwait was something that Silicio had been very worried about before the photo was published, according to Barry Fitzsimmons, a photo editor at the Times. "She has a mortgage to pay, and she really needs the job," said Fitzsimmons, who said he had a dozen phone conversations and exchanged 40 e-mails with Silicio before the photo was published. He and the newspaper's senior editors wanted to make sure she understood the possible consequences of publication.

                      "In the end, she felt she would be okay and she would be able to keep her job," Fitzsimmons said. "I think there is a little bit of being naive about the whole thing."

                      Silicio received no payment, but her name appeared under the photo.

                      Zuma Press, a photo agency, is handling distribution of the photo. Rights to publish it have been purchased by a weekly newsmagazine, according to Zuma.

                      Although photographs of flag-draped caskets returning from overseas fighting were common in the 1980s and 1990s, the Bush administration has enforced the ban on such images, saying it reflects families' wishes. Critics of the policy said the administration is trying to airbrush the realities of war.

                      "I feel if the administration were more sympathetic they would see that this is a positive thing," Silicio said in an e-mail yesterday. "When our loved ones are coming home, the families want to be there with them through the media, coming the whole way home."
                      Dude. Can. Fly.

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