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Rolling Stone's Immortals

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  • Rolling Stone's Immortals

    They did a feature on their top 50 Artists of all time, here is how THEY ranked them.

    1) The Beatles
    2) Bob Dylan
    3) Elvis Presley
    4) The Rolling Stones
    5) ChuckBerry 6) Jimi Hendrix
    7) James Brown
    8) Little Richard
    9) Aretha Franklin
    10) Ray Charles

    11) Bob Marley
    12) The Beach Boys
    13) Buddy Holly
    14) Led Zeppelin
    15) Stevie Wonder
    16) Sam Cooke
    17) Muddy Watters
    18) Marvin Gaye
    19) The Velvet Underground
    20) Bo Diddley
    21) Otis Redding
    22) U2
    23) Bruce Springsteen
    24) Jerry Lee Lewis
    25) Fats Domino
    26) The Ramones
    27) Nirvana
    28) Prince
    29) The Who
    30) The Clash
    31) Johnny Cash
    32) Smokey Robinson and the Miracles
    33) The Everly Brothers
    34) Neil Young
    35) Michael Jackson
    36) Madonna
    37) Roy Orbison
    38) John Lennon
    39) David Bowie
    40) Simon and Garfunkel
    41) The Doors
    42) Van Morrison
    43) Sly and the Family Stone
    44) Public Enemy
    45) The Byrds
    46) Janis Joplin
    47) Patti Smith
    48) Run-DMC
    49) Elton John
    50) The Band
    Be passionate about what you believe in, or why bother.

  • #2
    Rolling Stone.

    The liberal pinko mag run by Communist dupes.
    LONG LIVE THE NOTE!

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by DC Santana@Apr 17 2004, 08:13 AM
      Rolling Stone.

      The liberal pinko mag run by Communist dupes.
      I disagree, but regardless they do know music.
      Be passionate about what you believe in, or why bother.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by madyaks+Apr 17 2004, 07:24 AM-->
        QUOTE (madyaks @ Apr 17 2004, 07:24 AM)

      • #5
        I like Madonna, not sure about top 50. Patti Smith might have a place there.

        April 12, 2004 -- In the 1970s, Patti Smith hit the underground music scene with an ecstatic blend of free-form poetry and three-chord rock. The woman hailed as the "godmother of punk" credits her signature sound to lessons in free-verse defiance from 19th-century poet Arthur Rimbaud and 20th-century music legend Bob Dylan. Tracey Tanenbaum speaks with Smith for Intersections, a series on artists' influences.

        Smith, 57, spent most of her childhood in rural New Jersey. Gangly and rail thin, she fell short of the fleshier and blonder ideal of beauty of the day. "I didn't really mind being different," she says, "because I perceived that it was connected with creativity."

        Although Smith says she had no special talents of her own, she felt a kinship with artists. At age 16, she came across a book by Rimbaud in a pile of recycled paperbacks. "The language in it just totally seduced me, and I fell in love," she says.

        Rimbaud believed a poet's role was to jar the senses. As a teenager roaming the streets of Paris, he was one of the first to draw images from dreams and drug-induced states. Smith -- an outsider in high school -- clung to the bohemian poet as the ideal imaginary boyfriend.

        Smith suffered from a variety of illnesses growing up, which gave her plenty of opportunity to nourish her fantasy life. During a severe bout with the flu as a teen, Smith's mother introduced her to another companion -- a Dylan record.

        "It immediately spoke to me," Smith says, "and I became overjoyed to find this person, and I have been overjoyed ever since."

        Smith says she saw Dylan as a Rimbaud-like figure whose songs were rich in poetry, politics and substance. She began writing poetry of her own, and made a name for herself in Manhattan's underground arts scene before experimenting with music. She says her 1975 debut album, Horses, was her attempt to do for others what her artistic influences had done for her:

        "I was consciously trying to make a record that would make a certain type of person not feel alone. People who were like me, different… I wasn't targeting the whole world. I wasn't trying to make a hit record."

        She sounds cool.
        Be passionate about what you believe in, or why bother.

        Comment


        • #6
          Originally posted by madyaks@Apr 17 2004, 07:40 AM
          I like Madonna, not sure about top 50. Patti Smith might have a place there.

          April 12, 2004 -- In the 1970s, Patti Smith hit the underground music scene with an ecstatic blend of free-form poetry and three-chord rock. The woman hailed as the "godmother of punk" credits her signature sound to lessons in free-verse defiance from 19th-century poet Arthur Rimbaud and 20th-century music legend Bob Dylan. Tracey Tanenbaum speaks with Smith for Intersections, a series on artists' influences.

          Smith, 57, spent most of her childhood in rural New Jersey. Gangly and rail thin, she fell short of the fleshier and blonder ideal of beauty of the day. "I didn't really mind being different," she says, "because I perceived that it was connected with creativity."

          Although Smith says she had no special talents of her own, she felt a kinship with artists. At age 16, she came across a book by Rimbaud in a pile of recycled paperbacks. "The language in it just totally seduced me, and I fell in love," she says.

          Rimbaud believed a poet's role was to jar the senses. As a teenager roaming the streets of Paris, he was one of the first to draw images from dreams and drug-induced states. Smith -- an outsider in high school -- clung to the bohemian poet as the ideal imaginary boyfriend.

          Smith suffered from a variety of illnesses growing up, which gave her plenty of opportunity to nourish her fantasy life. During a severe bout with the flu as a teen, Smith's mother introduced her to another companion -- a Dylan record.

          "It immediately spoke to me," Smith says, "and I became overjoyed to find this person, and I have been overjoyed ever since."

          Smith says she saw Dylan as a Rimbaud-like figure whose songs were rich in poetry, politics and substance. She began writing poetry of her own, and made a name for herself in Manhattan's underground arts scene before experimenting with music. She says her 1975 debut album, Horses, was her attempt to do for others what her artistic influences had done for her:

          "I was consciously trying to make a record that would make a certain type of person not feel alone. People who were like me, different… I wasn't targeting the whole world. I wasn't trying to make a hit record."

          She sounds cool.
          The only comment I have about that is a quote from a Ted Nugent interview.

          "I can smell her from here."
          LONG LIVE THE NOTE!

          Comment


          • #7
            Rolling Stone the magazine and the Rolling Stones band have something in common....being overrated.

            I don't pay attention to either.
            Go Cards ...12 in 13.


            Comment


            • #8
              What were the criteria?

              Comment


              • #9
                Personally, I think Zeppelin should have been ranked number 1.

                That's just me though.
                Sometimes elections have positive consequences!

                Comment


                • #10
                  The Ramones at 26?

                  Well you know, it's a hip magazine.

                  Run by elitist liberals, simpering sycophants, and Communist dupes.
                  LONG LIVE THE NOTE!

                  Comment


                  • #11
                    I've got two issues...
                    First..I dont necessarily disagree with the musicians on that list..well, execpet maybe Madonna...but, damn I loved Like a Virgin video..I disagree with the rankings...The Band is better than #50...

                    Second..where the hell was Elvis Costello?? Not even in the Top 50...not many better singer/songwriters..

                    But..did give the love to Bruce..

                    Comment


                    • #12
                      There's a lot to argue with on this list....but I guess that's the point, huh?

                      Again, what were the criteria?

                      Comment


                      • #13
                        Reg..who on that list, do you feel..didnt belong..and, I am pretty sure you thought Madonna belonged..your type loves her.

                        Michael Jackson should have been higher than 35, though...

                        Comment


                        • #14
                          Bob Marley 11? Of all the acts in rock history, only 10 surpass Bob freakin' Marley?

                          Jerry Lee Lewis had two -- count 'em -- hits. Which is why I want to know what the criteria is.

                          Johnny Cash is on the list? Patti fuckin' Smith? Who?

                          And so on. I'd need it right in front of me to give you all my complaints.

                          Comment


                          • #15
                            Oh -- The Who at 29, trailing the Ramones. Yeah, I guess.

                            Comment

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