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  • Money poll: Tax cuts unpopular

    Money poll: Tax cuts unpopular; Most want jobs program and deficit reduction.
    Some 60% say they didn't benefit from tax cut. April 15, 2004: 11:28 AM EDT

    NEW YORK (CNN/Money) - Most Americans don't believe they benefited personally from the 2003 tax cut, according to a poll conducted for Money magazine, and would have preferred the government devoted resources to job creation or deficit reduction.

    The poll of 1,007 people, conducted last week by International Communications Research, found that 60 percent said the tax cut did not personally help them. Only about a third of respondents said they benefited from the tax cut.

    The poll also found Americans badly split along partisan lines on the question of whether the tax cut helped the economy. It found 79 percent of Republicans believed the tax cuts were somewhat or very successful in stimulating the economy, while 65 percent of Democrats said the cuts were not too successful or not at all successful.

    Independents were more evenly divided but overall skeptical of the tax cut's help to the economy, with 43 percent saying the cuts were very or somewhat successful and 52 percent saying they were not too successful or not successful at all.

    Overall 48.4 percent thought the tax cuts were very or somewhat helpful stimulating the economy, while 45.1 percent felt they were not at all or not too successful stimulating the economy.

    The poll found 76 percent of those surveyed would have preferred the government devote resources to job creation rather than the tax cut, and even 54 percent of Republicans would have chosen jobs over tax cuts. Democrats, at 89 percent, and independents at 83 percent were overwhelmingly in favor of jobs programs rather than tax cuts.

    A plurality of Americans also would have preferred deficit reduction over the tax cut, with 49 percent choosing deficit reduction and only 42 percent picking the cut. While a majority of Republicans would have chosen tax cuts over deficit reduction, Democrats picked deficit reduction by a two-to-one margin, while 49 percent of independents would have preferred reducing the federal deficit.

    Asked who would do a better job managing the economy, 41.4 percent of registered voters surveyed chose President Bush, narrowly edging out Democratic challenger John Kerry at 37.7 percent. That was just beyond the poll's 3.1 percent margin of error.

    A 51 percent majority said their own economic circumstance is the same as it was a year ago, while 27 percent said their own situation is better and 21 percent said it was worse. Among those who identified themselves as investors, 45 percent said their own financial condition was about the same as a year ago, despite the rise in U.S. stock markets during that time. Meanwhile 37.3 percent said they were better off while only 17.4 percent said they were worse off
    __________________________________________________ ___________________

    I find the results of the poll curious, at best.
    1) I question that the government could effectively devote resources to job creation.
    2) But, I also would have preferred deficit reduction over the tax cut.
    3) I personally didn't feel any significant benefit from the tax cuts?

    How about you?
    Norman Chad, syndicated columnist: “Sports radio, reflecting our sinking culture, spends entire days advising managers and coaches, berating managers and coaches, firing managers and coaches and searching the countryside for better middle relievers. If they just redirected their energy toward, say, crosswalk-signal maintenance, America would be 2 percent more livable.”

    "The best argument against democracy," someone (Churchill?) said, "is a five minute conversation with the average voter."

  • #2
    Not sure why 60% say the tax cuts didn't help them, that's just incorrect. 1/3 of all people who filed tax returns paid no taxes. A lot of them still got money back. Everybody wants the deficit reduced, but getting rid of the tax cuts won't even come close to doing it. What will is a growing economy. People will argue about the effect of tax cuts on the growth of the economy, but I doubt that many would argue that raising taxes now would help stimulate growth.

    I don't understand why people spend so much time worrying about tax cuts and not as much time worrying about why we are taxed so heavily, government spending.
    Asked what he would do differently in Iraq, Kerry said, "Right now, what I would do differently is, I mean, look, I'm not the president, and I didn't create this mess so I don't want to acknowledge a mistake that I haven't made."

    Comment


    • #3
      I don't understand why people spend so much time worrying about tax cuts and not as much time worrying about why we are taxed so heavily, government spending.
      I don't worry about being taxed so heavily BECAUSE of the second part of your question.... Spending.
      We need to PAY for all the crap that this president has written checks for.
      You know the party of smaller government, the party of fiscal conservatism, yeah that party, the party of spending to support big business! Thats why we need to be taxed. Obviously someone has to pay for all this crap including the 87 billion for war, or do we realize that number is a joke and it's going to be double that.

      Bush gave a HUGE amount of money back to the rich to stimulate growth. Growth is the American people spending money, the Rich already have the money to spend, they didn't need a tax cut to guy buy the stuff they need or want to buy, so giving them a cut wasn't going to stimulate a damn thing. And yes I said it back before we KNEW this was the truth.
      Be passionate about what you believe in, or why bother.

      Comment


      • #4
        Burn...your post has some problems...

        [/QUOTE] 1/3 of all people who filed tax returns paid no taxes. A lot of them still got money back.[QUOTE]

        I'd like to see your numbers on this. The truth is, while some people didn't have to pay any ADDITIONAL taxes on April 15th, people were still racked on their payroll taxes which disproportionately affects low to middle income workers. Not as many people got refunds as you think.

        I don't understand why people spend so much time worrying about tax cuts and not as much time worrying about why we are taxed so heavily, government spending.
        Again...I say if you support Bush, you're a hypocrite. While Kerry hasn't proposed any gutting of the federal government, I think he'll reduce spending by a token amount. Even if he gets it back in line with the Clinton years, he'll be a hell of a lot more successful about it than bush has.
        Are you on the list?

        Comment


        • #5
          yak i agree on both counts, we need more money flowing through the ecomomy not less

          Official Sponsor of Marco Gonzales and the Productive Out!!!


          Said the Quangle Wangle Quee

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by madyaks@Apr 16 2004, 07:34 AM
            I don't understand why people spend so much time worrying about tax cuts and not as much time worrying about why we are taxed so heavily, government spending.
            I don't worry about being taxed so heavily BECAUSE of the second part of your question.... Spending.
            We need to PAY for all the crap that this president has written checks for.
            You know the party of smaller government, the party of fiscal conservatism, yeah that party, the party of spending to support big business! Thats why we need to be taxed. Obviously someone has to pay for all this crap including the 87 billion for war, or do we realize that number is a joke and it's going to be double that.

            Bush gave a HUGE amount of money back to the rich to stimulate growth. Growth is the American people spending money, the Rich already have the money to spend, they didn't need a tax cut to guy buy the stuff they need or want to buy, so giving them a cut wasn't going to stimulate a damn thing. And yes I said it back before we KNEW this was the truth.
            Raising taxes to the pre-Bush level won't fix the deficit.

            The American people won't have money to spend unless a rich person has enough money left over taxes to give them a job. I think everone should get tax cuts. The rich shouldn't be left out just because they are rich. This isn't a communist country. The rich do foot the majority of the bill.

            You are right about one thing. Spending is out of control. That's our biggest problem, not tax rates.
            Asked what he would do differently in Iraq, Kerry said, "Right now, what I would do differently is, I mean, look, I'm not the president, and I didn't create this mess so I don't want to acknowledge a mistake that I haven't made."

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by SLUBLUE@Apr 16 2004, 07:42 AM
              Burn...your post has some problems...

              1/3 of all people who filed tax returns paid no taxes. A lot of them still got money back.

              I'd like to see your numbers on this. The truth is, while some people didn't have to pay any ADDITIONAL taxes on April 15th, people were still racked on their payroll taxes which disproportionately affects low to middle income workers. Not as many people got refunds as you think.

              I don't understand why people spend so much time worrying about tax cuts and not as much time worrying about why we are taxed so heavily, government spending.
              Again...I say if you support Bush, you're a hypocrite. While Kerry hasn't proposed any gutting of the federal government, I think he'll reduce spending by a token amount. Even if he gets it back in line with the Clinton years, he'll be a hell of a lot more successful about it than bush has.
              Proportionally, low income earners got a lot more back for the child tax credit. Is that fair?

              Spending is my biggest problem with Bush, and the reason there is a good chance I won't vote for him.
              Asked what he would do differently in Iraq, Kerry said, "Right now, what I would do differently is, I mean, look, I'm not the president, and I didn't create this mess so I don't want to acknowledge a mistake that I haven't made."

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by BurnKU+Apr 16 2004, 08:47 AM-->
                QUOTE (BurnKU @ Apr 16 2004, 08:47 AM)

              • #9
                Originally posted by madyaks+Apr 16 2004, 07:57 AM-->
                QUOTE (madyaks @ Apr 16 2004, 07:57 AM)
                Originally posted by [email protected] 16 2004, 08:47 AM

              • #10
                Funny, don't see anyone giving any jack back....

                Comment


                • #11
                  Originally posted by Reggie Cleveland@Apr 16 2004, 08:09 AM
                  Funny, don't see anyone giving any jack back....
                  you're assuming they got jack to begin with?
                  Are you on the list?

                  Comment


                  • #12
                    Originally posted by SLUBLUE@Apr 16 2004, 07:42 AM
                    people were still racked on their payroll taxes which disproportionately affects low to middle income workers.
                    The so-called "payroll taxes" consist of:

                    -6.2% social security tax (matched by the employer)
                    -1.45% medicare tax (matched by the employer)
                    -approx. 5-6% state and federal unemployment tax (paid directly by the employer, not the employee)

                    Each of the payroll taxes is designed to address a specific social program, most of which disproportionately benefit the middle and lower-middle class. Which one do you propose be cut?

                    Comment


                    • #13
                      Originally posted by Hedley Lamarr@Apr 16 2004, 08:21 AM

                      Each of the payroll taxes is designed to address a specific social program, most of which disproportionately benefit the middle and lower-middle class. Which one do you propose be cut?
                      I don't think any of the communists worry about "unfairness" here.
                      Asked what he would do differently in Iraq, Kerry said, "Right now, what I would do differently is, I mean, look, I'm not the president, and I didn't create this mess so I don't want to acknowledge a mistake that I haven't made."

                      Comment


                      • #14
                        Burn, I have a problem with the age-old argument that you make;

                        The American people won't have money to spend unless a rich person has enough money left over taxes to give them a job.
                        It's as if we are all to assume that the significantly wealthy folks out there are thinking to themselves, "If I can only get a large tax cut, I could open a business and hire a bunch of people".

                        I tend to imagine that they might be more inclined to be thinking about a second home, or a larger boat, a tennis court, a swimming pool ... or increasing their investment portfolio.

                        Comments?
                        Norman Chad, syndicated columnist: “Sports radio, reflecting our sinking culture, spends entire days advising managers and coaches, berating managers and coaches, firing managers and coaches and searching the countryside for better middle relievers. If they just redirected their energy toward, say, crosswalk-signal maintenance, America would be 2 percent more livable.”

                        "The best argument against democracy," someone (Churchill?) said, "is a five minute conversation with the average voter."

                        Comment


                        • #15
                          There are a lot of people that have arguments that the current tax code isn't fair. If we had a flat tax, not many people would be able to say that. Let's do that.
                          While this is as fair as possible to all people paying income tax, it's not very realistic.

                          Let's assume the flat income tax rate is 21%.

                          Worker A's annual income is $40,000.
                          Worker B's annual income is $350,000.

                          Worker A pays $8,400 in Income Tax.
                          Worker B pays $73,500 in Income tax.

                          Worker A's net annual income is $31,600.
                          Worker B's net annual income is $276,500.

                          I don't think you'd be able to convince Worker A that a flat tax benefits everyone fairly when Worker B doesn't have to worry about having enough income to cover the cost of living.

                          Comment

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