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  • Report Warned Bush Team About Intelligence Doubts

    Spin this.

    QUOTE
    November 6, 2005
    Report Warned Bush Team About Intelligence Doubts

    By DOUGLAS JEHL
    WASHINGTON, Nov. 5 — A top member of Al Qaeda in American custody was identified as a likely fabricator months before the Bush administration began to use his statements as the foundation for its claims that Iraq trained Al Qaeda members to use biological and chemical weapons, according to newly declassified portions of a Defense Intelligence Agency document.
    The document, an intelligence report from February 2002, said it was probable that the prisoner, Ibn al-Shaykh al-Libi, “was intentionally misleading the debriefers’’ in making claims about Iraqi support for Al Qaeda’s work with illicit weapons.

    The document provides the earliest and strongest indication of doubts voiced by American intelligence agencies about Mr. Libi’s credibility. Without mentioning him by name, President Bush, Vice President Dick Cheney, Colin L. Powell, then secretary of state, and other administration officials repeatedly cited Mr. Libi’s information as “credible’’ evidence that Iraq was training Al 8Qaeda members in the use of explosives and illicit weapons.

    Among the first and most prominent assertions was one by Mr. Bush, who said in a major speech in Cincinnati in October 2002 that “we’ve learned that Iraq has trained Al Qaeda members in bomb making and poisons and gases.’’

    The newly declassified portions of the document were made available by Senator Carl Levin of Michigan, the top Democrat on the Senate Armed Services Committee.

    Mr. Levin said the new evidence of early doubts about Mr. Libi’s statements dramatized what he called the Bush administration’s misuse of prewar intelligence to try to justify the war in Iraq. That is an issue that Mr. Levin and other Senate Democrats have been seeking to emphasize, in part by calling attention to the fact that the Republican-led Senate intelligence committee has yet to deliver a promised report, first sought more than two years ago, on the use of prewar intelligence.

    An administration official declined to comment on the D.I.A. report on Mr. Libi. But Senate Republicans, put on the defensive when Democrats forced a closed session of the Senate this week to discuss the issue, have been arguing that Republicans were not alone in making prewar assertions about Iraq, illicit weapons and terrorism that have since been discredited.

    Mr. Libi, who was captured in Pakistan at the end of 2001, recanted his claims in January 2004. That prompted the C.I.A., a month later, to recall all intelligence reports based on his statements, a fact recorded in a footnote to the report issued by the Sept. 11 commission.

    Mr. Libi was not alone among intelligence sources later determined to have been fabricating accounts. Among others, an Iraqi exile whose code name was Curveball was the primary source for what proved to be false information about Iraq and mobile biological weapons labs. And American military officials cultivated ties with Ahmad Chalabi, the head of the Iraqi National Congress, an exile group, who has been accused of feeding the Pentagon misleading information in urging war.

    The report issued by the Senate intelligence committee in July 2004 questioned whether some versions of intelligence report prepared by the C.I.A. in late 2002 and early 2003 raised sufficient questions about the reliability of Mr. Libi’s claims.

    But neither that report nor another issued by the Sept. 11 commission made any reference to the existence of the earlier and more skeptical 2002 report by the D.I.A., which supplies intelligence to military commanders and national security policy makers. As an official intelligence report, labeled DITSUM No. 044-02, the document would have circulated widely within the government, and it would have been available to the C.I.A., the White House, the Pentagon and other agencies. It remains unclear whether the D.I.A. document was provided to the Senate panel.

    In outlining reasons for its skepticism, the D.I.A. report noted that Mr. Libi’s claims lacked specific details about the Iraqis involved, the illicit weapons used and the location where the training was to have taken place.

    “It is possible he does not know any further details; it is more likely this individual is intentionally misleading the debriefers,’’ the February 2002 report said. “Ibn al-Shaykh has been undergoing debriefs for several weeks and may be describing scenarios to the debriefers that he knows will retain their interest.’’
    Mr. Powell relied heavily on accounts provided by Mr. Libi for his speech to the United Nations Security Council on Feb. 5, 2003, saying that he was tracing “the story of a senior terrorist operative telling how Iraq provided training in these weapons to Al Qaeda.’’

    At the time of Mr. Powell’s speech, an unclassified statement by the C.I.A. described the reporting, now known to have been from Mr. Libi, as “credible.’’ But Mr. Levin said he had learned that a classified C.I.A. assessment at the time stated “the source was not in a position to know if any training had taken place.’’

    In an interview on Friday, Mr. Levin also called attention to a portion of the D.I.A. report that expressed skepticism about the idea of close collaboration between Iraq and Al Qaeda, an idea that was never substantiated by American intelligence but was a pillar of the administration’s prewar claims.

    “Saddam’s regime is intensely secular and is wary of Islamic revolutionary movements,’’ the D.I.A. report said in one of two declassified paragraphs. “Moreover, Baghdad is unlikely to provide assistance to a group it cannot control.’’
    The request to declassify the two paragraphs was made on Oct. 18 by Mr. Levin and Senator John D. Rockefeller IV of West Virginia, the top Democrat on the Senate intelligence committee. In an Oct. 26 response, Kathleen P. Turner, chief of the D.I.A.’s office for Congressional affairs, said the agency “can find no reason for it to remain classified.’’

    At the time of his capture, Mr. Libi was the most senior Qaeda official in American custody. The D.I.A. document gave no indication of where he was being held, or what interrogation methods were used on him.

    Mr. Libi remains in custody, apparently at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, where he was sent in 2003, according to government officials.

    The Senate intelligence committee is scheduled to meet beginning next week to review draft reports prepared as part of a long-postponed “Phase II’’ of the panel’s review of prewar intelligence on Iraq. At separate briefings for reporters on Friday, Republicans staff members said the writing had long been under way, while Senate Democrats on the committee claimed credit for reinvigorating the process, by forcing the closed session. They said that already nearly complete is a look at whether prewar intelligence accurately predicted the potential for an anti-American insurgency.

    Other areas of focus include the role played by the Iraqi National Congress, that of the Pentagon in shaping intelligence assessments, and an examination of whether public statements about Iraq by members of the Bush and Clinton administrations, as well as members of Congress, were substantiated by intelligence available at the time.[/b][/quote]
    http://www.nytimes.com/2005/11/06/politics...agewanted=print
    No president wants war. Everything you may have heard is that, but it's just simply not true
    President George W. Bush, March 21, 2006

    I'm a war president
    President George W. Bush, February 8, 2004

  • #2
    Okay I'll try one.

    Al Qaeda official shapes US policy with lies.

    Al Qaeda 2, US 0
    No president wants war. Everything you may have heard is that, but it's just simply not true
    President George W. Bush, March 21, 2006

    I'm a war president
    President George W. Bush, February 8, 2004

    Comment


    • #3
      I think Chalabi is winning too.
      Dude. Can. Fly.

      Comment


      • #4
        Bush is an idiot. Anyone with half a brain can see that....unless they're blinded by partisanship, of course.

        It speaks volumes about this country that he could even get elected.
        " Look, forget the myths the media's created about the White House--the truth is, these are not very bright guys, and things got out of hand."

        Comment


        • #5
          Bush and Co. may go down as one of the worst adminstrations EVER in U.S. history.

          Comment


          • #6
            Shit. The hook is set and yanked.

            It'd be nice if the whole thing was published and not two paragraphs.

            It'd be nice if it was known whether congress had access to the report.

            I wonder what people would say if a source said bad things were happening, it was labeled disinformation and then it happened? I guess we'd call them stupid for not acting on it no matter what. Seems that happened before 9/11. Stuff dismissed.

            It's a tough job determining what is right to act on and what isn't. I would suggest it's probably not cut and dry to do that, either.

            Comment


            • #7
              QUOTE(GreatestShow99 @ Nov 5 2005, 10:00 PM) Quoted post
              Bush and Co. may go down as one of the worst adminstrations EVER in U.S. history. [/b][/quote]

              They may also go down as the best.

              You won't know until the history is written.

              Comment


              • #8
                QUOTE(pgrote @ Nov 5 2005, 10:02 PM) Quoted post

                QUOTE(GreatestShow99 @ Nov 5 2005, 10:00 PM) Quoted post
                Bush and Co. may go down as one of the worst adminstrations EVER in U.S. history. [/b][/quote]

                They may also go down as the best.

                You won't know until the history is written.
                [/b][/quote]

                Yeah, and I'm still waiting for pigs to fly.

                Comment


                • #9
                  QUOTE(pgrote @ Nov 5 2005, 11:02 PM) Quoted post

                  I wonder what people would say if a source said bad things were happening, it was labeled disinformation and then it happened? I guess we'd call them stupid for not acting on it no matter what. Seems that happened before 9/11. Stuff dismissed.

                  It's a tough job determining what is right to act on and what isn't. I would suggest it's probably not cut and dry to do that, either.
                  [/b][/quote]

                  A top member of Al Qaeda in American custody was identified as a likely fabricator months before the Bush administration began to use his statements as the foundation for its claims that Iraq trained Al Qaeda members to use biological and chemical weapons
                  Dude. Can. Fly.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    QUOTE(GreatestShow99 @ Nov 5 2005, 10:03 PM) Quoted post
                    QUOTE(pgrote @ Nov 5 2005, 10:02 PM) Quoted post

                    QUOTE(GreatestShow99 @ Nov 5 2005, 10:00 PM) Quoted post
                    Bush and Co. may go down as one of the worst adminstrations EVER in U.S. history. [/b][/quote]

                    They may also go down as the best.

                    You won't know until the history is written.
                    [/b][/quote]

                    Yeah, and I'm still waiting for pigs to fly. [/b][/quote]

                    It's just as silly of a statement as yours. lol

                    You don't know what's going to happen in the next 3 years nationally or internationally.

                    But yes, right now things aren't looking too good. I wonder if any other two term president had as much trouble during the second four years. And no, that's not a Clinton dig at all. Exclude him from the conversation.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      QUOTE(dvyyyyyy @ Nov 5 2005, 10:05 PM) Quoted post
                      QUOTE(pgrote @ Nov 5 2005, 11:02 PM) Quoted post

                      I wonder what people would say if a source said bad things were happening, it was labeled disinformation and then it happened? I guess we'd call them stupid for not acting on it no matter what. Seems that happened before 9/11. Stuff dismissed.

                      It's a tough job determining what is right to act on and what isn't. I would suggest it's probably not cut and dry to do that, either.
                      [/b][/quote]

                      A top member of Al Qaeda in American custody was identified as a likely fabricator months before the Bush administration began to use his statements as the foundation for its claims that Iraq trained Al Qaeda members to use biological and chemical weapons
                      [/b][/quote]
                      You need to explain your response instead of quoting things.

                      Are you saying he was a likely fabricator? If so, my question stands.

                      I am willing to admit he lied and we ran with it. Our difference is that I don't think it's easy to determine these things. It's the one thing that you and I haven't agreed on, and we never will. This is a different era with different rules and decision making processes.

                      Are you right? Maybe. Am I right? Maybe. We don't know. All we know is that X happened and we need to see the end result to determine if it's beneficial or not.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        pgrote,

                        I bet the same thing was said about Nixon circa 1972.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          QUOTE(GreatestShow99 @ Nov 5 2005, 10:11 PM) Quoted post
                          pgrote,

                          I bet the same thing was said about Nixon circa 1972. [/b][/quote]
                          Possibly.

                          I think for GWB it's either going to be really really good or really really bad. As with all things related to him, there is no middle ground.

                          What I think will be interesting to see if/when 20 years from now everything comes out. That is if the government allows it.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Traitors.
                            Be passionate about what you believe in, or why bother.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              An oldie but a goodie:

                              Damn these electric sex pants!

                              26+31+34+42+44+46+64+67+82+06 = 10

                              Bring back the death penalty for corporations!

                              Comment

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