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Con-man, Cheney's Daddy Ahmed Chalabi back in the U.S. fold

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  • Con-man, Cheney's Daddy Ahmed Chalabi back in the U.S. fold

    From Joe Klein in Time:

    Searching for Saviors in Strange Places
    Could Ahmad Chalabi end up running Iraq?

    Posted Saturday, Oct. 22, 2005
    You remember Ahmad Chalabi. He was once the Bush Administration's favorite Iraqi exile. His group, the Iraqi National Congress, provided all sorts of wondrous reports about Saddam Hussein's weapons of mass destruction (some of which Judith Miller disseminated in the New York Times). He convinced certified hardfellahs like Vice President Dick Cheney that American troops would be greeted in Baghdad with flowers and candy. He was smooth as oil and wicked smart, with a math degree from M.I.T. More than a few Bush Administration officials hoped Chalabi would quickly take control in Baghdad after Saddam was deposed, and allow the U.S. to get out of Dodge within months.

    Wrong, of course. And when the Iraqis proved to be just a bit less welcoming than Chalabi had predicted, and no WMD were found, he fell hard. By the spring of 2004, Chalabi's home was raided by U.S. forces. His associates were suspected of fraud, torture, kidnapping and misuse of U.S. funds. Chalabi was suspected of spying for the Iranians. But nothing much came of that. Chalabi soon leveraged American disapproval into Baghdad street cred and a burgeoning career as a leader of the Shi'ite coalition. He currently serves as Deputy Prime Minister in Ibrahim al-Jaafari's government. And now—trumpet clarion here—he is coming back to Washington in November at the invitation of Treasury Secretary John Snow. But Chalabi will have potentially more significant meetings with National Security Adviser Stephen Hadley and perhaps Condoleezza Rice, both of whom—according to high-ranking Administration officials—believe that he is a plausible and acceptable candidate to be the next Prime Minister of Iraq when that nation votes, yet again, for a new government on Dec. 15.

    It is the latest signpost in the Bush Administration's hegira from lunatic idealism to utter desperation in Iraq, and it comes at a crucial moment. Iraq's fate--well, the U.S.'s fate in Iraq--will be decided in the next six months. There are few optimists left in the Congress, intelligence community or U.S. military. But the Bush Administration harbors a gossamer strand of hope that the Dec. 15 election will finally produce a strong Iraqi government, a real coalition of Shi'ites, Sunnis and Kurds. The Administration also realizes it may take a supremely oleaginous political thug, perhaps someone as rare and fetid as Ahmad Chalabi, to bring it off.

    The gossamer scenario begins with the assumption that the inept and corrupt al-Jaafari government has discredited itself with the Iraqis. It certainly has no allies left in the Bush Administration. "Jaafari overplayed his hand," says an official, referring to the Prime Minister's overly friendly relations with Iran. There is a possibility that the current ruling alliance of religious Shi'ite parties will split apart. There is the probability that the Grand Ayatullah Ali Husaini Sistani—the most respected religious figure in the country—will not endorse the Shi'ite slate, as he did last time, even if it holds together. There is also the assumption that the Sunnis, having participated in the Oct. 15 constitutional referendum, will become a significant political force in December (despite well-documented ballot stuffing in the recent vote). All of which would create some running room for the formation of a new and creative coalition.

    Chalabi is not the Bush Administration's first choice to preside over that coalition. "We have no preferences," a senior Administration official told me. Former Prime Minister Iyad Allawi, a tough guy, secular Shi'ite and former CIA client, was the White House's covert favorite in last January's election, but he received only 14% of the vote. Allawi is trying to be a better politician this time, building a coalition slate with prominent Kurds and Sunnis. And he has credibility—and contacts—with the less extreme elements of the Sunni insurgency. But Allawi has limited appeal among religious Shi'ites, and therefore the Bush Administration has hopes for two other possible leaders. One is Adil Abdul Mahdi, said to be among the more pragmatic religious Shi'ite leaders. And then there is Chalabi, who has built a formidable network of Shi'ite associates that includes the radical firebrand cleric Muqtada al-Sadr. Of course, Chalabi has serious downsides as well—aside from the greasy residue on his resume. The Sunnis don't like him. He has been an advocate of the most extreme and injudicious de-Baathification proposals. When asked how Chalabi might bring the Sunnis back into the fold, an Administration official told me, "You've heard about Nixon to China?" It might be more like Michael Corleone to Cuba. And it must be emphasized that any successful Iraqi government remains the longest of long shots—especially with an insurgency that continues to grow more effective and lethal as the months pass. But wouldn't it be deliriously weird if Ahmad Chalabi turned out to be the top guy after all?
    Dude. Can. Fly.

  • #2
    So this is a story about the upcoming elections and who the possible candidates are for the PM position?
    "You can't handle my opinions." Moedrabowsky

    Jeffro is a hell of a good man.

    "A liberal is a man too broadminded to take his own side in a quarrel." - Robert Frost

    Comment


    • #3
      Jesus we know this guy lied to us... fuck he must be one big contributor.
      Be passionate about what you believe in, or why bother.

      Comment


      • #4
        I guess we're as desperate as we were in Vietnam, you know, winning every battle from the Tet Offensive onward, fending off dope smoking social fascist hippies at home, hanging the South Vietnamese out to dry when Congress went full-blown pansy...

        you know, American flakiness at its best

        Comment


        • #5
          QUOTE(madyaks @ Nov 4 2005, 09:33 AM) Quoted post

          Jesus we know this guy lied to us... fuck he must be one big contributor.
          [/b][/quote]

          Yes, because the words "plausible" and "acceptable" equate to an all out endorsement of the guy. Do you honestly think administration officials would publicly criticize him prior to the election?
          "You can't handle my opinions." Moedrabowsky

          Jeffro is a hell of a good man.

          "A liberal is a man too broadminded to take his own side in a quarrel." - Robert Frost

          Comment


          • #6
            The smart money has been on this guy for a while. We need a thug there to hold shit together like Saddam did.
            But wait. There is something that can be done afterall. My good friend Angelo is a cop in the Tampa/Clearwater area. Since I kept all of the files from the access logs when I had the power to see them, guess what, I have everyone's IP addresses. Hmm..what can I do w/ those??
            ...

            Comment


            • #7
              QUOTE(FAR52 @ Nov 4 2005, 09:38 AM) Quoted post
              QUOTE(madyaks @ Nov 4 2005, 09:33 AM) Quoted post

              Jesus we know this guy lied to us... fuck he must be one big contributor.
              [/b][/quote]

              Yes, because the words "plausible" and "acceptable" equate to an all out endorsement of the guy. Do you honestly think administration officials would publicly criticize him prior to the election? [/b][/quote]

              This idiot and his bullshit are part of the reason we are at war, he lied to us forever. He shouldn't be allowed into the United States, at least not if he isn't in chains.

              QUOTE
              From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Chalabi is a highly controversial figure for many reasons. In the lead-up to the 2003 invasion of Iraq, under his guidance the INC provided a major portion of the information on which U.S. Intelligence based its condemnation of Saddam Hussein including reports of weapons of mass destruction and alleged ties to al-Qaeda Much of this information has turned out to be false, and led to a recent falling out between him and the United States[/b][/quote]
              Be passionate about what you believe in, or why bother.

              Comment


              • #8
                QUOTE(madyaks @ Nov 4 2005, 09:50 AM) Quoted post

                QUOTE(FAR52 @ Nov 4 2005, 09:38 AM) Quoted post
                QUOTE(madyaks @ Nov 4 2005, 09:33 AM) Quoted post

                Jesus we know this guy lied to us... fuck he must be one big contributor.
                [/b][/quote]

                Yes, because the words "plausible" and "acceptable" equate to an all out endorsement of the guy. Do you honestly think administration officials would publicly criticize him prior to the election? [/b][/quote]

                This idiot and his bullshit are part of the reason we are at war, he lied to us forever. He shouldn't be allowed into the United States, at least not if he isn't in chains.

                QUOTE
                From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Chalabi is a highly controversial figure for many reasons. In the lead-up to the 2003 invasion of Iraq, under his guidance the INC provided a major portion of the information on which U.S. Intelligence based its condemnation of Saddam Hussein including reports of weapons of mass destruction and alleged ties to al-Qaeda Much of this information has turned out to be false, and led to a recent falling out between him and the United States[/b][/quote]
                [/b][/quote]

                They guy is a candidate for PM -- and apparently has some support over in Iraq. Like it or not Mad, we have to deal with him.
                "You can't handle my opinions." Moedrabowsky

                Jeffro is a hell of a good man.

                "A liberal is a man too broadminded to take his own side in a quarrel." - Robert Frost

                Comment


                • #9
                  Didn't we learn from "dealing with" the last fucking idiot in charge over there?

                  Seriously.
                  Be passionate about what you believe in, or why bother.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    QUOTE(FAR52 @ Nov 4 2005, 09:55 AM) Quoted post

                    They guy is a candidate for PM -- and apparently has some support over in Iraq. [/b][/quote]

                    Not from Iraqis he doesn't.
                    His mind is not for rent, to any god or government.
                    Pointless debate is what we do here -- lvr

                    Comment

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