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  • Rosa Parks

    WASHINGTON — Black civil rights pioneer Rosa Parks (search) would be the first woman to lie in honor in the Capitol Rotunda under resolutions prepared Thursday by lawmakers.

    Parks' refusal to give up her bus seat to a white man in Montgomery, Ala., in 1955 led to a 381-day boycott of the city's bus system and helped spark the modern civil rights movement. She died Monday in Detroit at age 92.

    The House and Senate were expected to consider a resolution allowing her remains to lie in honor in the Rotunda on Sunday and Monday "so that the citizens of the United States may pay their last respects to this great American," according to a draft of the measure from the office of Sen. Carl Levin (search), D-Mich.

    In most cases, only presidents, members of Congress and military commanders have been permitted to lie in the Rotunda.

    Parks would be the first woman and second black American to receive the accolade. Jacob J. Chestnut, one of two Capitol police officers fatally shot in 1998, was the first black American to lie in honor, said Senate historian Richard Baker (search).

    Parks also would be the second non-governmental official to be commemorated that way. The first was Pierre L'Enfant, the architect who designed Washington, D.C., who died in 1825 and was reinterred in 1909. The most recent person to lie in repose in the Capitol was President Reagan in 2004.

    Officials with the Rosa & Raymond Parks Institute for Self Development (search) in Detroit said at one point that Parks would lie in repose at the Lincoln Memorial. The National Park Service, however, said those plans were never formalized.

    Lila Cabbil, the institute's president emeritus, said Thursday the information was released prematurely and the foundation and the Parks family were working with Reps. John Conyers and Carolyn Cheeks Kilpatrick, D-Mich., and the White House to make arrangements to have a viewing in Washington.

    The Capitol event was one of several planned to honor the civil rights pioneer. Parks will lie in repose Saturday at the St. Paul AME Church in Montgomery, Ala., and a memorial service will be held at the church Sunday morning.

    Following her viewing in the Capitol, a memorial service was planned for Monday at St. Paul AME Church in Washington.

    From Monday night until Wednesday morning, Parks will lie in repose at the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History in Detroit. Her funeral will be Wednesday at Greater Grace Temple Church in Detroit.

    Officials in Detroit and Montgomery, Ala., meanwhile, said the first seats of their buses would be reserved as a tribute to Parks' legacy until her funeral next week. Detroit Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick put a black ribbon Thursday on the first passenger seat of one of about 200 buses where seats will be reserved.

    "We cannot do enough to pay tribute to someone who has so positively impacted the lives of millions across the world," Kilpatrick said
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  • #2
    QUOTE(Johnny H @ Oct 27 2005, 06:20 PM) Quoted post

    WASHINGTON — Black civil rights pioneer Rosa Parks (search) would be the first woman to lie in honor in the Capitol Rotunda under resolutions prepared Thursday by lawmakers.

    Parks' refusal to give up her bus seat to a white man in Montgomery, Ala., in 1955 led to a 381-day boycott of the city's bus system and helped spark the modern civil rights movement. She died Monday in Detroit at age 92.

    The House and Senate were expected to consider a resolution allowing her remains to lie in honor in the Rotunda on Sunday and Monday "so that the citizens of the United States may pay their last respects to this great American," according to a draft of the measure from the office of Sen. Carl Levin (search), D-Mich.

    In most cases, only presidents, members of Congress and military commanders have been permitted to lie in the Rotunda.

    Parks would be the first woman and second black American to receive the accolade. Jacob J. Chestnut, one of two Capitol police officers fatally shot in 1998, was the first black American to lie in honor, said Senate historian Richard Baker (search).

    Parks also would be the second non-governmental official to be commemorated that way. The first was Pierre L'Enfant, the architect who designed Washington, D.C., who died in 1825 and was reinterred in 1909. The most recent person to lie in repose in the Capitol was President Reagan in 2004.

    Officials with the Rosa & Raymond Parks Institute for Self Development (search) in Detroit said at one point that Parks would lie in repose at the Lincoln Memorial. The National Park Service, however, said those plans were never formalized.

    Lila Cabbil, the institute's president emeritus, said Thursday the information was released prematurely and the foundation and the Parks family were working with Reps. John Conyers and Carolyn Cheeks Kilpatrick, D-Mich., and the White House to make arrangements to have a viewing in Washington.

    The Capitol event was one of several planned to honor the civil rights pioneer. Parks will lie in repose Saturday at the St. Paul AME Church in Montgomery, Ala., and a memorial service will be held at the church Sunday morning.

    Following her viewing in the Capitol, a memorial service was planned for Monday at St. Paul AME Church in Washington.

    From Monday night until Wednesday morning, Parks will lie in repose at the Charles H. Wright Museum of African American History in Detroit. Her funeral will be Wednesday at Greater Grace Temple Church in Detroit.

    Officials in Detroit and Montgomery, Ala., meanwhile, said the first seats of their buses would be reserved as a tribute to Parks' legacy until her funeral next week. Detroit Mayor Kwame Kilpatrick put a black ribbon Thursday on the first passenger seat of one of about 200 buses where seats will be reserved.

    "We cannot do enough to pay tribute to someone who has so positively impacted the lives of millions across the world," Kilpatrick said
    [/b][/quote]

    Will she be in the front or back of the Rotunda?
    I'm here until I'm gone, then I'm somewhere else!

    Comment


    • #3
      Too soon?

      Comment


      • #4
        Her skull will end up in New Haven with Geronimo's and JFK's.

        /torch
        Damn these electric sex pants!

        26+31+34+42+44+46+64+67+82+06 = 10

        Bring back the death penalty for corporations!

        Comment


        • #5
          12/1/1955








          From this day forward, I no longer shall tinker with the machinery of death.

          For more than 20 years I have endeavored-indeed, I have struggled-along with a majority of this Court, to develop procedural & substantive rules that would lend more than the mere appearance of fairness to the death penalty endeavor.


          I feel morally and intellectually obligated simply to concede that the death penalty experiment has failed.

          The path the Court has chosen lessens us all. I dissent.

          Comment


          • #6
            From this day forward, I no longer shall tinker with the machinery of death.

            For more than 20 years I have endeavored-indeed, I have struggled-along with a majority of this Court, to develop procedural & substantive rules that would lend more than the mere appearance of fairness to the death penalty endeavor.


            I feel morally and intellectually obligated simply to concede that the death penalty experiment has failed.

            The path the Court has chosen lessens us all. I dissent.

            Comment

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