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  • Which historical general are you?

    http://www.okcupid.com/tests/take?testid=1...291814577368116

    This takes awhile but is interesting.

    For the record: I'm

    King Edward I
    You scored 62 Wisdom, 64 Tactics, 58 Guts, and 54 Ruthlessness!
    Or rather, King Edward the Longshanks if you've seen Braveheart. You, like Edward, are incredibly smart and shrewd, but you win at any costs.... William Wallace died at his hands after a fierce Scottish rebellion against his reign. Despite his reputation though, Longshanks had the best interests of his people at heart. But God help you if you got on his bad side.

  • #2
    Julius Caesar
    You scored 51 Wisdom, 75 Tactics, 50 Guts, and 45 Ruthlessness!
    Roman military and political leader. He was instrumental in the transformation of the Roman Republic into the Roman Empire. His conquest of Gallia Comata extended the Roman world all the way to the Atlantic Ocean, introducing Roman influence into what has become modern France, an accomplishment of which direct consequences are visible to this day. In 55 BC Caesar launched the first Roman invasion of Britain. Caesar fought and won a civil war which left him undisputed master of the Roman world, and began extensive reforms of Roman society and government. He was proclaimed dictator for life, and heavily centralized the already faltering government of the weak Republic. Caesar's friend Marcus Brutus conspired with others to assassinate Caesar in hopes of saving the Republic. The dramatic assassination on the Ides of March was the catalyst for a second set of civil wars, which marked the end of the Roman Republic and the beginning of the Roman Empire under Caesar's grand-nephew and adopted son Octavian, later known as Caesar Augustus. Caesar's military campaigns are known in detail from his own written Commentaries (Commentarii), and many details of his life are recorded by later historians such as Suetonius, Plutarch, and Cassius Dio.

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    • #3
      King Edward I
      You scored 66 Wisdom, 81 Tactics, 50 Guts, and 54 Ruthlessness!
      Or rather, King Edward the Longshanks if you've seen Braveheart. You, like Edward, are incredibly smart and shrewd, but you win at any costs.... William Wallace died at his hands after a fierce Scottish rebellion against his reign. Despite his reputation though, Longshanks had the best interests of his people at heart. But God help you if you got on his bad side.
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      • #4
        King Edward I
        You scored 72 Wisdom, 73 Tactics, 43 Guts, and 51 Ruthlessness!
        Or rather, King Edward the Longshanks if you've seen Braveheart. You, like Edward, are incredibly smart and shrewd, but you win at any costs.... William Wallace died at his hands after a fierce Scottish rebellion against his reign. Despite his reputation though, Longshanks had the best interests of his people at heart. But God help you if you got on his bad side.

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        • #5
          QUOTE
          You scored higher than 2% on Guts[/b][/quote]

          Sounds about right.

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          • #6
            Vercingetorix
            You scored 81 Wisdom, 58 Tactics, 56 Guts, and 53 Ruthlessness!
            Leader of the Gauls, a chieftain of the Arverni. He was the leader of the great revolt against the Romans in 52 BC. Julius Caesar, upon hearing of the trouble, rushed to put it down. Vercingetorix was, however, an able leader and adopted the policy of retreating to heavy, natural fortifications and burning the Gallic towns to keep the Roman soldiers from living off the land. Caesar and his chief lieutenant Labienus lost in minor engagements, but when Vercingetorix shut himself up in Alesia and summoned all his Gallic allies to attack the besieging Romans, the true brilliance of Caesar appeared. He defeated the Gallic relieving force and took the fortress. Vercingetorix was captured and, after gracing Caesar's triumphal return to Rome, was put to death.

            You scored higher than 80% on Unorthodox

            You scored higher than 14% on Tactics

            You scored higher than 61% on Guts

            You scored higher than 53% on Ruthlessness

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            • #7
              General Tso
              You seem to take a liking to his tasty Chinese dish, and for that you will remain forever portly.

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              • #8
                Ulysses S. Grant
                You scored 66 Wisdom, 54 Tactics, 67 Guts, and 57 Ruthlessness!
                Like you, Grant went about the distasteful business of war realistically and grimly. His courage as a commander of forces and his powers of organization and administration made him the outstanding Northern general. Grant, though, had no problem throwing away lives on huge seiges of heavily defended positions. At times, Union casualties under Grant were over double that of the Confederacy. However, Grant was notably wise in supporting good commanders, especially Sheridan , William T. Sherman , and George H. Thomas. Made a full general in 1866, he was the first U.S. citizen to hold that rank.
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                • #9
                  QUOTE(CSD @ Oct 25 2005, 12:32 PM) Quoted post

                  Ulysses S. Grant
                  You scored 66 Wisdom, 54 Tactics, 67 Guts, and 57 Ruthlessness!
                  Like you, Grant went about the distasteful business of war realistically and grimly. His courage as a commander of forces and his powers of organization and administration made him the outstanding Northern general. Grant, though, had no problem throwing away lives on huge seiges of heavily defended positions. At times, Union casualties under Grant were over double that of the Confederacy. However, Grant was notably wise in supporting good commanders, especially Sheridan , William T. Sherman , and George H. Thomas. Made a full general in 1866, he was the first U.S. citizen to hold that rank.
                  [/b][/quote]


                  ++
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                  "When you say 'radical right' today, I think of these moneymaking ventures by fellows like Pat Robertson and others who are trying to take the Republican Party and make a religious organization out of it. If that ever happens, kiss politics goodbye."
                  -Barry Goldwater

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                  • #10
                    General Custer
                    You scored 59 Wisdom, 46 Tactics, 61 Guts, and 60 Ruthlessness!
                    You're reckless... a little like Custer. Make sure you know what you're up against before you charge into battle. But, that being said, Custer was one of the more successful generals of his day. He was a graduate of West Point and one of the more senior officers in the Union army. Custer had a distinguished career until his untimely demise at Little Bighorn.

                    In the comprehensive campaign against the Sioux planned in 1876, Custer's regiment was detailed to the column under the commanding general, Alfred H. Terry, that marched from Bismarck to the Yellowstone River. At the mouth of the Rosebud, Terry sent Custer forward to locate the enemy while he marched on to join the column under Gen. John Gibbon. Custer came upon the warrior encampment on the Little Bighorn on June 25 and decided to attack at once. He divided his regiment into three parts, sending two of them, under Major Marcus A. Reno and Capt. Frederick W. Benteen, to attack farther upstream, while he himself led the third (a little over 200 men) in a direct charge. Every one of them was killed in battle. Reno and Benteen were themselves kept on the defensive, and not until Terry's arrival was the extent of the tragedy known.



                    My test tracked 4 variables How you compared to other people your age and gender:

                    You scored higher than 35% on Unorthodox
                    You scored higher than 6% on Tactics
                    You scored higher than 76% on Guts
                    You scored higher than 87% on Ruthlessness

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                    • #11
                      QUOTE(pgrote @ Oct 25 2005, 12:34 PM) Quoted post

                      General Custer
                      You scored 59 Wisdom, 46 Tactics, 61 Guts, and 60 Ruthlessness!
                      You're reckless... a little like Custer. Make sure you know what you're up against before you charge into battle. But, that being said, Custer was one of the more successful generals of his day. He was a graduate of West Point and one of the more senior officers in the Union army. Custer had a distinguished career until his untimely demise at Little Bighorn.

                      In the comprehensive campaign against the Sioux planned in 1876, Custer's regiment was detailed to the column under the commanding general, Alfred H. Terry, that marched from Bismarck to the Yellowstone River. At the mouth of the Rosebud, Terry sent Custer forward to locate the enemy while he marched on to join the column under Gen. John Gibbon. Custer came upon the warrior encampment on the Little Bighorn on June 25 and decided to attack at once. He divided his regiment into three parts, sending two of them, under Major Marcus A. Reno and Capt. Frederick W. Benteen, to attack farther upstream, while he himself led the third (a little over 200 men) in a direct charge. Every one of them was killed in battle. Reno and Benteen were themselves kept on the defensive, and not until Terry's arrival was the extent of the tragedy known.



                      My test tracked 4 variables How you compared to other people your age and gender:

                      You scored higher than 35% on Unorthodox
                      You scored higher than 6% on Tactics
                      You scored higher than 76% on Guts
                      You scored higher than 87% on Ruthlessness
                      [/b][/quote]

                      Never divide your force.

                      Moon

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                      • #12
                        King Edward I
                        You scored 62 Wisdom, 69 Tactics, 59 Guts, and 57 Ruthlessness!

                        Or rather, King Edward the Longshanks if you've seen Braveheart. You,
                        like Edward, are incredibly smart and shrewd, but you win at any
                        costs.... William Wallace died at his hands after a fierce Scottish
                        rebellion against his reign. Despite his reputation though, Longshanks
                        had the best interests of his people at heart. But God help you if you
                        got on his bad side.



                        My test tracked 4 variables How you compared to other people your age and gender:
                        You scored higher than 49% on Unorthodox
                        You scored higher than 45% on Tactics
                        You scored higher than 67% on Guts
                        You scored higher than 81% on Ruthlessness
                        Link: written by dasnyds on , home of the 32-Type Dating Test
                        If you believe in something sacrifice a hobo to it or don't bother.

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                        • #13
                          I tried to pick the most heinous choices. lol

                          Torture if the know something? Sure.

                          Torture if the don't know anything? Sure.

                          Fight to the death against all odds? Sure.

                          lol

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                          • #14
                            QUOTE
                            King Edward I
                            You scored 62 Wisdom, 73 Tactics, 56 Guts, and 61 Ruthlessness!
                            Or rather, King Edward the Longshanks if you've seen Braveheart. You, like Edward, are incredibly smart and shrewd, but you win at any costs.... William Wallace died at his hands after a fierce Scottish rebellion against his reign. Despite his reputation though, Longshanks had the best interests of his people at heart. But God help you if you got on his bad side.[/b][/quote]

                            "Can't buy what I want because it's free...
                            Can't buy what I want because it's free..."
                            -- Pearl Jam, from the single Corduroy

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                            • #15


                              Moon

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