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Let's do the "back peddle" John Kerry style..

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  • Let's do the "back peddle" John Kerry style..

    wubba wubba wubba wubba wubba wubba wubba
    ---------------------------------------------------------

    Kerry Says He Would Cap Federal Spending
    4 minutes ago

    By NEDRA PICKLER, Associated Press Writer

    WASHINGTON - Democrat John Kerry (news - web sites) said Wednesday if he is elected president he will not let government programs outside of security and education grow beyond the rate of inflation, even if it means cutting some of his own campaign promises and existing government programs.


    "When I say a cap on spending, I mean it," Kerry said in a speech prepared for delivery Wednesday. "We will have to make real choices — and that includes priorities of my own."


    Kerry said he would freeze the federal travel budget, reduce oil royalty exemptions for drilling on federal lands, cut 100,000 federal government contractors, and cut electricity used by the federal government by 20 percent, among other programs.


    Kerry said with the growing deficit, he'll have to "slow down" some of his campaign promises or phase them in over a longer period. He cited proposals for early childhood education and a program that would have provided tuition to students attending state colleges in exchange for two years of national service, although he didn't say how much they would be scaled back.


    Kerry said his four budget principles will be:


    _ cutting taxes that benefit the middle class, such as cuts for health care and education.


    _ restoring "pay as you go" budget rules that require spending and tax cuts to be offset by cuts in other programs or tax increases. Kerry said he will pay for much of his spending by repealing the Bush tax cuts for Americans who make more than $200,000 a year.


    _ requiring that spending, other than education and security, does not grow faster than inflation.


    _ cutting corporate welfare and using the savings to reduce the deficit.


    Kerry's appearance at Georgetown University was billed as a speech on his economic policy, but it was largely an indictment of President Bush (news - web sites)'s stewardship over the national deficit.


    Kerry said unlike Bush, he will pay for all of his programs and he will cut the deficit in half in four years. Bush has made the same promise but, Kerry said, "his record shows that we can't trust what he says."


    "A deficit-reduction promise from George W. Bush is not exactly a gilt-edged bond," Kerry said. "If he continued in the presidency and performed as he has in the past, a third Bush term could mean a third Bush recession."


    Kerry has yet to offer a detailed budget that explains how much he is spending on his campaign promises and where he will get the money to pay for them.


    The Bush campaign said that third-party calculations of 44 of Kerry's programs show they would cost about $1 trillion over five years — an amount he can't pay without raising taxes. Kerry told reporters Tuesday, "I think it's fuzzy math, as usual, and they're not telling the truth."


    Bush campaign spokesman Steve Schmidt said Kerry's numbers don't add up.


    "John Kerry's refusal to detail a plan means his speech is a mix of political theater and rhetorical nonsense," Schmidt said. "John Kerry has previously voted against discretionary spending caps. This is yet another example of Kerry's campaign rhetoric being disconnected from the reality of his record."


    Kerry promised to work with Sen. John McCain, R-Ariz. The two men have co-sponsored a bill that would create a commission that would recommend budget cuts and submit them to Congress for a yes-or-no vote with no amendments to keep pet projects.





    "John McCain can't get anyone in the Bush White House to listen to our proposal," he said. "If I'm president, John McCain will get the first pen when I sign this bill into law."

    ___
    Make America Great For Once.

  • #2
    He's going to use a "trust fund" or "lockbox", right?
    And, frankly, it has never occured to me that "winning" a debate is important, or that I should be hurt when someone like Airshark or kah, among others (for whom winning a pseudo debate or declaring intellectual superiority over invisible others is obviously very important) ridicule me.

    -The Artist formerly known as King in KC

    Comment


    • #3
      Rs should beware a Kerry/McCain ticket...
      The Dude abides.

      Comment


      • #4
        Yeah, right.
        And, frankly, it has never occured to me that "winning" a debate is important, or that I should be hurt when someone like Airshark or kah, among others (for whom winning a pseudo debate or declaring intellectual superiority over invisible others is obviously very important) ridicule me.

        -The Artist formerly known as King in KC

        Comment


        • #5
          The McCain equation

          The GOP senator has been closer to Kerry than to Bush, but he's silent on if those ties might affect the race.

          By Mark Z. Barabak
          Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
          April 6, 2004

          John McCain won't talk about John F. Kerry.

          Which is a pity for those who enjoy news of the man-bites-dog, black-is-white, day-is-night variety.

          One of the last times McCain spoke publicly about his friend and Senate colleague, he said he might become Kerry's vice presidential running mate, if the opportunity arose. Never mind the implausibility of the two — a Southwestern moderate conservative and Northeastern moderate liberal — comfortably coexisting in the White House. The sheer audacity of such a blending was enough to electrify insiders for a few hours last month, until McCain pulled the plug with a bland statement ruling it out.

          But then, just a few days later, McCain popped up on another of the morning chat shows, this time disputing the notion that Kerry was some kind of national security wimp, as suggested in President Bush's campaign ads. "No, I do not believe he is, quote, 'weak on defense,' " McCain said of the presumptive Democratic nominee. "I don't agree with him on some issues, clearly, but I decry the negativism that's going on on both sides."

          That one stoked flame-throwers on the right — many of whom loathe McCain — who tore into the Arizona Republican for not only failing to toe the party line but also trampling all over it.

          And so McCain won't discuss Kerry (D-Mass.) these days.

          "Appearing in a piece like this just adds fuel to the speculation fire," said McCain spokesman Marshall Wittmann, explaining the senator's refusal to be interviewed.

          Leaving one to ask: What motivates McCain, who continues to beguile and irritate four years after a rollicking and, ultimately, losing bid for the Republican presidential nomination?

          Is it the bond he and Kerry forged as Vietnam vets — a former prisoner of war and former protester — who came together to help a nation bind its wounds over the bitter conflict? "It's the 'Band of Brothers' phenomenon," said Douglas Brinkley, a University of New Orleans historian, who interviewed both for his book on Kerry's Vietnam service. "Either you went to 'Nam or you didn't."

          Is it McCain's long-standing distaste for the grubbier side of politics, the mudslinging and mooching off donors, which resulted in the campaign finance overhaul bill that bears his name? "He's a guy who believes in trying to find common sense and the truth in politics," said Kerry, who celebrates his friendship with McCain in the forward of "Call to Service," his campaign book.

          "He's not interested in the rat-a-tat. He's interested in real issues."

          Or is it McCain's way of needling Bush and the people who put him in the White House, after a brutal primary fight that left hard feelings on both sides?

          "He's not the kind of person who goes around screaming about past injustices," said one veteran of the 2000 campaign, who spoke anonymously because of the senator's wish not to contribute to this article. "But John McCain knows how to get under George Bush's skin, and he enjoys doing it."

          One thing is clear: McCain remains an unlikely political force, and not because he tries to please people. "There are two types of guys in this town: those that get ulcers and those that give ulcers," said Scott Reed, a Washington lobbyist and Republican strategist. "John McCain is clearly the latter."

          And although some Republicans — the Bush team among them — "roll their eyes … , at the end of the day they take McCain seriously," Reed said.

          Given his widespread popularity, they have little choice.

          Common ground

          In 1985, McCain and Kerry appeared on a public television program marking the 10th anniversary of the fall of Saigon. Among the sad legacies of the Vietnam War, McCain said, was the poison the conflict introduced into the nation's politics. "We find people impugning each other's patriotism, motivations [and] dedication to peace and freedom, which is totally unfortunate and demeans the level of debate," said McCain, then a sophomore congressman.

          Kerry didn't necessarily agree. "I'm not sure that it isn't healthy that we are asking the questions we are asking and being as inquisitive and demanding as we are," he said.

          The two were not friendly. McCain spent 5 1/2 years as a prisoner of war in Hanoi, learning of the growing antiwar movement back home from fellow POWs, who tapped out messages on his cell wall. In 1984, McCain opposed Kerry in his first race for U.S. Senate, denouncing him for tossing away his ribbons during a protest at the U.S. Capitol.

          Their relationship thawed a few years later when McCain and Kerry were together on a flight to Kuwait for an inspection tour after the Persian Gulf War. The two began talking about their shared Vietnam experience, and by "daybreak we shared a new understanding — and a new friendship," Kerry wrote in his campaign book.

          Their friendship grew during a Senate investigation that settled the touchy question of whether American prisoners were still being held in Vietnam. The work — steeped in grief, anger and wild conspiracy theories — was a nightmare, said Frances Zwenig, who directed the committee staff. "It was also one of the most worthwhile things any of us have ever done."

          During one particular venomous hearing, when an activist accused McCain of betraying his country and fellow veterans, Kerry laid a calming hand on his colleague's arm.

          In 1995, McCain and Kerry stood together in the White House, symbols of reconciliation, as President Clinton announced the normalization of diplomatic ties to Vietnam.

          Still, for all of that, the two are leagues apart on most issues, making their political pairing seem more workable in the abstract than it probably would be in reality. As McCain put it, "It's impossible to imagine the Democratic Party seeking a pro-life, free-trading, non-protectionist, deficit hawk." Privately, McCain has groused that Kerry is making more of their friendship, for political sake, than he would like.

          "The bottom line is that, while Sen. Kerry is a friend, Sen. McCain supports President Bush for reelection," said Wittmann, McCain's spokesman.

          Chilly relations

          The thing that makes the McCain-Kerry relationship so intriguing — apart from the odd-bedfellows business — is the tortured McCain-Bush relationship.

          The two got along well enough during most of the 2000 primary season. Then McCain buried Bush in a New Hampshire landslide and the race headed to South Carolina, home to possibly the meanest politics in America. The contest started on the low road and quickly descended from there. Bush appeared alongside the head of a fringe group that accused McCain of abandoning the nation's veterans. (Kerry circulated a letter signed by the Senate's four other Vietnam vets, condemning the attack.)

          The anonymous smear campaign was even uglier. McCain was accused of fathering a child with a black prostitute, and pictures of his adopted daughter, a Bangladeshi orphan, were circulated as proof. Stories of his wife's past addiction to painkillers were also widely disseminated. McCain seethed. He also lost South Carolina, and with it any chance at the nomination. (For their part, Bush and his aides were livid over phone calls placed to Michigan voters painting Bush as anti-Catholic.) After quitting the GOP race and waiting two months, McCain finally endorsed Bush — literally through clenched teeth. "Take the medicine now," is how McCain described it.

          Their relationship has scarcely improved since. Although McCain has sided with Bush more often than not — he was a leading advocate of war with Iraq — he has differed often enough to be a continued pain in the president's backside. He opposed the 2001 tax cut at the centerpiece of Bush's domestic agenda. He allied with Democrats seeking stiffer rules on gun show sales and new rights for medical patients. Most famously, he pushed the campaign finance legislation that bears his name — and which Bush reluctantly signed into law. In a pointed snub, McCain was informed by a mid-level White House aide, who called him at home.

          Slights like that fueled the resentment that still smolders inside many McCain loyalists. Some were insulted when the senator was asked to campaign earlier this year for Bush in New Hampshire. The result was a listless appearance, with McCain barely mentioning either Bush or the Democrats running. "You don't ask a guy to go back to the high point of his candidacy to campaign in what is essentially a meaningless event," griped one of the senator's friends.

          For the record, Bush campaign officials say they are pleased McCain has agreed to serve as co-chairman of the president's Arizona effort. Bush "understands that we have a party where people can have different ideas," said Scott Stanzel, a campaign spokesman. "But in the end, President Bush is going to work with members of Congress, including Sen. McCain, to make sure we grow the economy and have an aggressive policy to fight and win the war on terror."

          Honesty is his policy

          With McCain you either take it or leave it. The quality that so aggrieves many fellow Republicans — his willingness to state what he thinks, regardless — is what others find so appealing.

          Last week, McCain criticized Bush's conduct of the war in Iraq, as well as the Republican Party's stand on the environment and minority issues.

          "From a partisan standpoint, I wish he wouldn't say some of what he says," said Tucson's Mike Hellon, who serves on the Republican National Committee. "On the other hand, and I've told him this, the single most important element of his overwhelming popularity is his candor. People know when he speaks that he's telling what he thinks without any varnish or veneer. In today's political environment, that's an unusual asset."

          McCain is easily the most popular politician in Arizona, polls show, and much better liked than Bush. But his greatest strength is his national appeal to Democrats and independents, those very people Bush needs to woo and win in November.

          "If I were writing a memo to Ed Gillespie [the Republican Party chairman], I would tell him, 'Be thankful you've got guys like John McCain,' "said one of the senator's closest advisors.

          By swallowing hard — taking their medicine — Bush and his team can only hope that McCain will help more than hurt once he starts talking about Kerry again.
          The Dude abides.

          Comment


          • #6
            Be very afraid, if we start seeing the two main parties merge.
            Make America Great For Once.

            Comment


            • #7
              Moe:

              Its a non-issue. McCain was on the Today Show this morning and stated unequivocally that he would not leave the Republican Party and that he would not be John Kerry's Vice-President.
              "You can't handle my opinions." Moedrabowsky

              Jeffro is a hell of a good man.

              "A liberal is a man too broadminded to take his own side in a quarrel." - Robert Frost

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by FAR52@Apr 7 2004, 12:08 PM
                Moe:

                Its a non-issue. McCain was on the Today Show this morning and stated unequivocally that he would not leave the Republican Party and that he would not be John Kerry's Vice-President.
                Missed that. That he had to come on national tv and state such is telling. Thanks.
                The Dude abides.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Kev,

                  The fact that this could even be considered tells you all you need to know.
                  And, frankly, it has never occured to me that "winning" a debate is important, or that I should be hurt when someone like Airshark or kah, among others (for whom winning a pseudo debate or declaring intellectual superiority over invisible others is obviously very important) ridicule me.

                  -The Artist formerly known as King in KC

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by The Kev@Apr 7 2004, 11:44 AM
                    Be very afraid, if we start seeing the two main parties merge.
                    Why is this such a huge issue with you? Who cares, really? If the ticket produces good things, who gives a damn if it consists of a democrat and a republican?

                    People always have to stay with tradition and nothing should change. This is a big reason why this country is so screwed up.
                    *Syria becomes the 7th predominantly Muslim country bombed by 2009 Nobel Peace Laureate Barack Obama—after Afghanistan, Pakistan, Yemen, Somalia, Libya and Iraq

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Moe_Szyslak+Apr 7 2004, 12:09 PM-->
                      QUOTE (Moe_Szyslak @ Apr 7 2004, 12:09 PM)

                    • #12
                      Originally posted by Moe_Szyslak+Apr 7 2004, 12:09 PM-->
                      QUOTE (Moe_Szyslak @ Apr 7 2004, 12:09 PM)

                    • #13
                      Kerry Says He Would Cap Federal Spending
                      4 minutes ago
                      Update on his next position in 4 more minutes

                      Comment


                      • #14
                        Originally posted by dhaab+Apr 7 2004, 01:26 PM-->
                        QUOTE (dhaab @ Apr 7 2004, 01:26 PM)

                      • #15
                        Originally posted by The Kev+Apr 7 2004, 12:38 PM-->
                        QUOTE (The Kev @ Apr 7 2004, 12:38 PM)
                        Originally posted by [email protected] 7 2004, 01:26 PM
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