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  • Games played under protest

    Let's say, for sake of argument, that it was clear the umpire in last night's CHI-LA game was wrong. Now let's say the Angels play the game under protest.

    I said there's never been a game changed after it was protested. Others say the Brett pine-tar game was overturned....I think they might be right. Are they?
    "There are only two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle."
    --Albert Einstein

  • #2
    QUOTE(kennyboyerfan @ Oct 13 2005, 04:57 PM) Quoted post

    Let's say, for sake of argument, that it was clear the umpire in last night's CHI-LA game was wrong. Now let's say the Angels play the game under protest.

    I said there's never been a game changed after it was protested. Others say the Brett pine-tar game was overturned....I think they might be right. Are they?
    [/b][/quote]
    I believe so...they finished the game later on in the year from that point on...

    "Can't buy what I want because it's free...
    Can't buy what I want because it's free..."
    -- Pearl Jam, from the single Corduroy

    Comment


    • #3
      Have there been other games reversed or replayed? Anybody know?

      Somebody track down backstop on his way to the game. He knows everything.
      "There are only two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle."
      --Albert Einstein

      Comment


      • #4
        QUOTE(kennyboyerfan @ Oct 13 2005, 04:57 PM) Quoted post

        Let's say, for sake of argument, that it was clear the umpire in last night's CHI-LA game was wrong. Now let's say the Angels play the game under protest.

        I said there's never been a game changed after it was protested. Others say the Brett pine-tar game was overturned....I think they might be right. Are they?
        [/b][/quote]

        I remember the Brett game being protested.

        As 007 mentioned, they replayed the part of the game that took place after Brett was called out.
        Of course you do.

        Comment


        • #5
          It's time for the Stan Papi Bat Signal. I'll put it up.

          Comment


          • #6
            Thanks, pgrote. I fear we've lost Kaiser for good. And it appears he may have taken Reggie with him.
            "There are only two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle."
            --Albert Einstein

            Comment


            • #7
              The Brett game was indeed replayed from the point of his at-bat.

              Don't know of any others.
              I like cheese.

              Comment


              • #8
                QUOTE(pgrote @ Oct 13 2005, 05:08 PM) Quoted post

                It's time for the Stan Papi Bat Signal. I'll put it up.
                [/b][/quote]

                You rang?

                Courtesy of retrosheet (I wish I could take credit for it)...

                QUOTE
                Resumed Protested Games
                Most protests of games are not upheld. Usually this is because the issue boils down to umpires' judgment, which will be allowed to stand. There have been some games when the protest has been upheld, usually because the umpires misinterpreted the rules. Perhaps, the most famous case is the George Brett pine tar bat homer on 7/24/83. When a protest is upheld, the game is supposed to be played from the point of the protested play as corrected. In the Brett case, he was originally called out and his homer nullified for using an illegal bat, but the rules do not permit that as the penalty for having a bat with too much pine tar is that it is removed from the game. When the protest was upheld, the homer was allowed to stand, and the game picked up from that point.

                There have also been times when the protest has been upheld, but the game has not been resumed. One infamous example was the Cardinals at Dodgers game on 7/20/47 where both teams batted in the ninth, but neither made three outs! There is a brief description after the list of resumed protested games.

                Jim Smith has provided a number of protested games that were picked up from the point of protest at a later date. The list likely is not complete. Please let us know if you can add to it. The last two have links to their boxscores and play-by-play descriptions.

                Latest additions: (on 10/11/2005): 5/15/1975

                NL NY at Phi 30 Aug 1913 (game finished 2 Oct)
                NL Phi at NY 5 Jul 1920 (2nd) (game finished 4 Sep)
                NL Cin at Pit 28 May 1921 (game finished 30 Jun) Details
                NL StL at Chi 2 Jul 1934 (game finished 31 Jul)
                NL Bro at Pit 25 Aug 1947 (game finished 21 Sep)
                NL Cin at Mil 22 Sep 1954 (game finished 24 Sep)
                NL Atl at Mon 15 May 1975 (game finished 20 Jul)
                AL KC at NY 24 Jul 1983 (game finished 18 Aug)
                NL StL at Pit 16 Jun 1986 (game finished 18 Jun)

                July 20, 1947, St. Louis at Brooklyn: In the top of the ninth with the Cards ahead 2-0, Ron Northey hits a high fly deep to the wall in right center. The Dodgers CF Pete Reiser leaps but can't catch it, and after a couple of seconds the ball drops back on the field where RF Dixie Walker fields it, relays it to 2B Eddie Stanky, whose throw nails Northey at home. The first base umpire (there was a three man crew in those days) immediately ruled the ball in play, but the other base umpire signaled to Northey that it was a homer, so Northey slowed up. He was ruled out at the plate, and the Cards protested the game saying Northey had been deceived by the umpire and would have scored if he had not slowed down.

                In the bottom of the ninth, the Dodgers scored three runs to win the game before the protest by a 3-2 score. NL President Ford Frick, who later became Commissioner, upheld the protest and awarded Northey a home run. However, he did not order the game resumed in the top of the ninth with the Cards ahead 3-0, which would have been the normal procedure called for by the rules. He allowed the Dodgers' runs to stand and ruled the game a 3-3 tie. (We can only speculate on what he would have decided if the Dodgers had hit a homer in the bottom of the ninth and scored four runs.) All the records counted except for the pitchers' win and loss. The game was replayed in its entirety as part of a doubleheader on August 18 that the Dodgers won.

                Retrosheet's Dave Smith wrote an article about this game, which has more details, in the Society for American Baseball Research publication The Baseball Research Journal, Number 33, (2004). [/b][/quote]

                Comment


                • #9
                  Stan the man is taken, so it'll be Stan the Answer Man.

                  Thanks, buddy!

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Wow. Stan, your next mission is to find weapons of mass destruction in Iraq.
                    "There are only two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle."
                    --Albert Einstein

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      QUOTE(kennyboyerfan @ Oct 13 2005, 05:12 PM) Quoted post
                      Thanks, pgrote. I fear we've lost Kaiser for good. And it appears he may have taken Reggie with him. [/b][/quote]
                      Alas, Kaiser is being held for ransom by Andy Pettite's knee.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        For what it's worth, I believe the '86 Cardinals protest that was upheld, involved the umps not waiting long enough during the initial rain delay, calling off the game, and then the weather cleared before the mandatory time elapsed.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          So let me ask ... what is the process for officially protesting a game? Does the manager have to request it through the crew chief? Can the team management do it after the game? Can a protest be denied before it is researched by the league?

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            QUOTE(Stan_Papi @ Oct 13 2005, 04:14 PM) Quoted post

                            QUOTE(pgrote @ Oct 13 2005, 05:08 PM) Quoted post

                            It's time for the Stan Papi Bat Signal. I'll put it up.
                            [/b][/quote]

                            You rang?

                            Courtesy of retrosheet (I wish I could take credit for it)...

                            QUOTE
                            Resumed Protested Games
                            Most protests of games are not upheld. Usually this is because the issue boils down to umpires' judgment, which will be allowed to stand. There have been some games when the protest has been upheld, usually because the umpires misinterpreted the rules. Perhaps, the most famous case is the George Brett pine tar bat homer on 7/24/83. When a protest is upheld, the game is supposed to be played from the point of the protested play as corrected. In the Brett case, he was originally called out and his homer nullified for using an illegal bat, but the rules do not permit that as the penalty for having a bat with too much pine tar is that it is removed from the game. When the protest was upheld, the homer was allowed to stand, and the game picked up from that point.

                            There have also been times when the protest has been upheld, but the game has not been resumed. One infamous example was the Cardinals at Dodgers game on 7/20/47 where both teams batted in the ninth, but neither made three outs! There is a brief description after the list of resumed protested games.

                            Jim Smith has provided a number of protested games that were picked up from the point of protest at a later date. The list likely is not complete. Please let us know if you can add to it. The last two have links to their boxscores and play-by-play descriptions.

                            Latest additions: (on 10/11/2005): 5/15/1975

                            NL NY at Phi 30 Aug 1913 (game finished 2 Oct)
                            NL Phi at NY 5 Jul 1920 (2nd) (game finished 4 Sep)
                            NL Cin at Pit 28 May 1921 (game finished 30 Jun) Details
                            NL StL at Chi 2 Jul 1934 (game finished 31 Jul)
                            NL Bro at Pit 25 Aug 1947 (game finished 21 Sep)
                            NL Cin at Mil 22 Sep 1954 (game finished 24 Sep)
                            NL Atl at Mon 15 May 1975 (game finished 20 Jul)
                            AL KC at NY 24 Jul 1983 (game finished 18 Aug)
                            NL StL at Pit 16 Jun 1986 (game finished 18 Jun)

                            July 20, 1947, St. Louis at Brooklyn: In the top of the ninth with the Cards ahead 2-0, Ron Northey hits a high fly deep to the wall in right center. The Dodgers CF Pete Reiser leaps but can't catch it, and after a couple of seconds the ball drops back on the field where RF Dixie Walker fields it, relays it to 2B Eddie Stanky, whose throw nails Northey at home. The first base umpire (there was a three man crew in those days) immediately ruled the ball in play, but the other base umpire signaled to Northey that it was a homer, so Northey slowed up. He was ruled out at the plate, and the Cards protested the game saying Northey had been deceived by the umpire and would have scored if he had not slowed down.

                            In the bottom of the ninth, the Dodgers scored three runs to win the game before the protest by a 3-2 score. NL President Ford Frick, who later became Commissioner, upheld the protest and awarded Northey a home run. However, he did not order the game resumed in the top of the ninth with the Cards ahead 3-0, which would have been the normal procedure called for by the rules. He allowed the Dodgers' runs to stand and ruled the game a 3-3 tie. (We can only speculate on what he would have decided if the Dodgers had hit a homer in the bottom of the ninth and scored four runs.) All the records counted except for the pitchers' win and loss. The game was replayed in its entirety as part of a doubleheader on August 18 that the Dodgers won.

                            Retrosheet's Dave Smith wrote an article about this game, which has more details, in the Society for American Baseball Research publication The Baseball Research Journal, Number 33, (2004). [/b][/quote]
                            [/b][/quote]

                            Here's one more, from 1932:

                            QUOTE
                            » August 12, 1932: AL president Will Harridge upholds Detroit's protest of its August first game against NY and orders it replayed on September 8. Detroit had protested because Tony Lazzeri's and Ben Chapman's batting order was orally reversed after the lineup cards were handed in before the game.[/b][/quote]
                            Damn these electric sex pants!

                            26+31+34+42+44+46+64+67+82+06 = 10

                            Bring back the death penalty for corporations!

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              And another, same page.

                              QUOTE
                              » September 15, 1937: AL President Will Harridge upholds Cleveland's protest of the August 6 Yankee win, and the entire game is replayed as the 2nd game of a doubleheader. The protested game is called a tie with all stats retained except those following the disputed call. [/b][/quote]
                              Damn these electric sex pants!

                              26+31+34+42+44+46+64+67+82+06 = 10

                              Bring back the death penalty for corporations!

                              Comment

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