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Bush' approval rating dips to all-time low

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  • Bush' approval rating dips to all-time low

    Bush approval dips below 40 percent

    Mark Murray
    Political reporter

    WASHINGTON - It has been weeks since Hurricane Katrina slammed into the Gulf Coast; since gas prices began spiking to record highs; and since Cindy Sheehan, whose son was killed in Iraq, held her antiwar vigil outside President Bush’s Texas ranch. But, according to the latest NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll, the fortunes of the Bush administration and the Republican Party have not yet begun to recover.

    For the first time in the poll, Bush’s approval rating has sunk below 40 percent, while the percentage believing the country is heading in the right direction has dipped below 30 percent. In addition, a sizable plurality prefers a Democratic-controlled Congress, and just 29 percent think Supreme Court nominee Harriet Miers is qualified to serve on the nation’s highest court.

    "Any way you slice this data, I think these are just terrible sets of numbers," said Democratic pollster Peter D. Hart, who conducted this survey with Republican pollster Bill McInturff.

    The poll shows that Bush’s approval rating stands at 39 percent, a new low for the president. In the last NBC/Wall Street Journal survey, which was released in mid-September, 40 percent approved of Bush’s job performance while 55 percent disapproved. In addition, just 28 percent believe the country is headed in the right direction, another all-time low in Bush’s presidency.

    Strikingly, much has happened in the time between those two polls — many of them seemingly positive events for the White House. The president delivered a prime-time speech from New Orleans, in which he promised to rebuild the Gulf Coast. He also made several more visits to the region, to examine the damage caused by Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Furthermore, he saw the Senate confirm John Roberts to the Supreme Court, and he nominated Miers, his White House counsel, to replace retiring Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O’Connor.

    Huge question mark’ on Miers

    The Miers nomination, however, has disappointed some of the president’s conservative supporters, because they say she lacks judicial experience and a clear conservative record on social issues. According to the poll, 29 percent say she’s qualified to serve on the Supreme Court, while 24 percent think she’s unqualified. Forty-six percent say they don’t know enough about her.

    "There is nothing to suggest that people have turned on her," Hart said. "But there is just a huge question mark behind her at this stage. She has to establish her own bona fides."

    The poll, which has a margin of error of plus or minus 3.4 percentage points and which was conducted from Oct. 8-10 of 807 adults, also finds that strong majorities don’t believe that the recent charges against GOP leaders Tom DeLay of Texas and Bill Frist of Tennessee are politically motivated. Sixty-five percent say that DeLay’s indictment on charges of illegally using corporate contributions for political campaigns suggests potential illegal activity, while 24 percent say the indictment is politics as usual and has little merit. (Since his indictment, DeLay stepped down from his leadership position but still plays a prominent role in the U.S. House of Representatives.)

    Meanwhile, 57 percent say Frist’s sale of stock in a company his family runs — just before the value of the stock declined — indicates potential illegal activity, compared with 28 percent who say the charge has little merit.

    48 percent want Democratic-controlled Congress

    In addition, with 13 months until the 2006 congressional elections, 48 percent say they prefer a Democratic-controlled Congress, compared with 39 percent who want the Republicans to control Capitol Hill. In fact, that nine-point difference is the largest margin between the parties in the 11 years the NBC/Journal poll has been tracking this question.

    But Hart argues that Democrats aren’t necessarily responsible for this margin. "It is not that Democrats have done so well," he said. "It is that people are disgusted." McInturff puts it this way: "People are very turned off and unhappy with the state of play in American politics."

    People also seem to be turned off and unhappy with high gas prices. According to the survey, 69 percent believe the worst is still to come with energy and fuel prices. Just 25 percent think the worst is behind us.

    Because of this generally sour attitude, the NBC/Journal pollsters doubt that Bush will be able to climb out of his standing anytime soon. "His trampoline [is] made of cement," Hart said
    .

    And while McInturff thinks that Bush’s approval rating actually may actually hover between 40 and 45 percent, he says that’s still problematic terrain from which to govern. "It is a very difficult place to be."
    "Let me lay it right on the line. Bigotry and racism are among the deadliest social ills plaguing the world today. The only way to destroy them is to expose them. If man is ever to be worthy of his destiny, we must fill our hearts with tolerance.- Stan Lee (circa 1968)

    "Compete less with the person in front of you than the person inside of you." - Anonymous

  • #2
    I blame Clinton for this.
    Norman Chad, syndicated columnist: “Sports radio, reflecting our sinking culture, spends entire days advising managers and coaches, berating managers and coaches, firing managers and coaches and searching the countryside for better middle relievers. If they just redirected their energy toward, say, crosswalk-signal maintenance, America would be 2 percent more livable.”

    "The best argument against democracy," someone (Churchill?) said, "is a five minute conversation with the average voter."

    Comment


    • #3
      The scary thing about that - if there is a strong third party candidate, 39% could be enough for Bush to get re-elected.

      Comment


      • #4
        QUOTE(nick2 @ Oct 13 2005, 10:12 AM) Quoted post
        I blame Clinton for this. [/b][/quote]

        Nice. [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/laugh.gif[/img]

        Comment


        • #5
          So basically, less than quarter of our voting population trusts either party.

          If there is wisdom in numbers, what side of the fence do you want to be on?
          Un-Official Sponsor of Randy Choate and Kevin Siegrist

          Comment


          • #6
            QUOTE(nick2 @ Oct 13 2005, 10:12 AM) Quoted post

            I blame Clinton for this.
            [/b][/quote]
            I want you to use your vast resources and find more polling numbers on this....

            "Can't buy what I want because it's free...
            Can't buy what I want because it's free..."
            -- Pearl Jam, from the single Corduroy

            Comment


            • #7
              while i am sure bush's numbers are down and likely are all-time lows, i always question these polls. remember when the exit polls at election time showed bush getting clobbered?

              personally, i have never been called or canvassed for a political question. so who are these pollsters asking?

              all i know is that the silent majority has long been a major power and guess which party that silent party typically backs? it isnt the dems. so i will believe a dem controlled congress when i see it. with the exception of the cities, the country is still conservative and when the election comes around next fall, i expect the republican congress to hold.
              Roy Mueller

              "It's kind of fun to do the impossible."

              - Walt Disney

              Comment


              • #8
                The exit polls were a whole different animal than polls like this are.

                The Dems need to come up with some viable candidates and a clear message if they want to gain in Congress.
                “I’ve always stated, ‘I’m a Missouri Tiger,’” Anderson said March 13 after Arkansas fired John Pelphrey, adding, “I’m excited about what’s taking place here.”

                Asked then if he would talk to his players about the situation, he said, “They know me, and that’s where the trust comes in.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I blame the exit polling.


                  And, the ballots are confusing.


                  I would bet his approval rating is somewhere around 80-90%.
                  Official Lounge Sponsor of Candy.


                  "When you say 'radical right' today, I think of these moneymaking ventures by fellows like Pat Robertson and others who are trying to take the Republican Party and make a religious organization out of it. If that ever happens, kiss politics goodbye."
                  -Barry Goldwater

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    QUOTE(El Birdo 1 @ Oct 13 2005, 11:58 AM) Quoted post

                    I blame the exit polling.


                    And, the ballots are confusing.


                    I would bet his approval rating is somewhere around 80-90%.
                    [/b][/quote]

                    If they hadn't left the silent majority out of their sample.
                    No president wants war. Everything you may have heard is that, but it's just simply not true
                    President George W. Bush, March 21, 2006

                    I'm a war president
                    President George W. Bush, February 8, 2004

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      You see the approval rating for Bush from blacks?

                      [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/ph34r.gif[/img]

                      From NBC's "First Read" this morning.

                      'Republican National Committee chair Ken Mehlman has made concerted efforts to draw African-American voters to the GOP. But in the wake of the government's perceived slow response to Hurricane Katrina, Bush's job approval among African-Americans stands at 2%. While 28% of all those polled say the country is heading in the right direction, only 5% of African-Americans do. "Not that African-Americans are ever a core part of the GOP coalition," McInturff notes, but these results "are some of the most difficult numbers" he says he's seen out of the community."
                      “I’ve always stated, ‘I’m a Missouri Tiger,’” Anderson said March 13 after Arkansas fired John Pelphrey, adding, “I’m excited about what’s taking place here.”

                      Asked then if he would talk to his players about the situation, he said, “They know me, and that’s where the trust comes in.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Not that unusual. The lowest poll numbers for the past 7 presidents:

                        Johnson: 35%
                        Nixon: 24%
                        Ford: 37%
                        Carter: 28%
                        Reagan: 35%
                        Bush I: 29%
                        Clinton: 37%


                        Source: http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m0KVD/is_1_3/ai_109025096/pg_4

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          QUOTE(Razzy @ Oct 13 2005, 11:11 AM) Quoted post

                          You see the approval rating for Bush from blacks? [/b][/quote]
                          Razz:

                          Look at the numbers for Senator Shelby from Alabama.

                          One year, he ran as a Democrat and got like 93% of the black vote.

                          Six years later, he ran as a Republican and got like 7% of the black vote.

                          That's just one example.

                          Hoot!

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            QUOTE(billiken_roy @ Oct 13 2005, 09:31 AM) Quoted post

                            remember when the exit polls at election time showed bush getting clobbered?
                            [/b][/quote]
                            He was getting clobbered, but the douchebags who build the crooked Diebold "voting" machines thought and rigged their results otherwise. Not to mention all of the poor people who were denied a vote due to long lines (especially in Ohio) in their polling areas while in the wealthy areas you could cast your vote and be on your way in under ten minutes. And I wonder how those people tended to vote???

                            The silent majority is a myth.

                            Bush is a rat fuck and should be impeached.

                            But it's easiet to blame Clinton. So God bless oxycontin boy.
                            The only good is knowledge and the only evil is ignorance.---Socrates
                            A good decision is based on knowledge and not on numbers.---Plato


                            Comment


                            • #15
                              QUOTE(nick2 @ Oct 13 2005, 10:12 AM) Quoted post
                              I blame Clinton for this. [/b][/quote]



                              I do too, but it is a good thing. People can remember prosperity, low gas prices (god put a big oil guy in office, everyone he appoints is big oil, and the price of oil in this country is at an all time high, SHOCKING), people remember not being at war, and yeah they remember a BJ and now are going "what was the big deal"
                              Be passionate about what you believe in, or why bother.

                              Comment

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