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Python Bursts After Trying to Eat Gator

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  • Python Bursts After Trying to Eat Gator




    Python Bursts After Trying to Eat Gator

    By DENISE KALETTE, Associated Press Writer1 hour, 12 minutes ago

    The alligator has some foreign competition at the top of the Everglades food chain, and the results of the struggle are horror-movie messy.

    A 13-foot Burmese python recently burst after it apparently tried to swallow a live, six-foot alligator whole, authorities said.

    The incident has heightened biologists' fears that the nonnative snakes could threaten a host of other animal species in the Everglades.

    "It means nothing in the Everglades is safe from pythons, a top-down predator," said Frank Mazzotti, a University of Florida wildlife professor.

    Over the years, many pythons have been abandoned in the Everglades by pet owners.

    The gory evidence of the latest gator-python encounter — the fourth documented in the past three years — was discovered and photographed last week by a helicopter pilot and wildlife researcher.

    The snake was found with the gator's hindquarters protruding from its midsection. Mazzotti said the alligator may have clawed at the python's stomach as the snake tried to digest it.

    In previous incidents, the alligator won or the battle was an apparent draw.

    "There had been some hope that alligators can control Burmese pythons," Mazzotti said. "This indicates to me it's going to be an even draw. Sometimes alligators are going to win and sometimes the python will win."

    It is unknown how many pythons are competing with the thousands of alligators in the Everglades, but at least 150 have been captured in the past two years, said Joe Wasilewski, a wildlife biologist and crocodile tracker.

    Pythons could threaten many smaller species that conservationists are trying to protect, including other reptiles, otters, squirrels, woodstorks and sparrows, Mazzotti said.

    Wasilewski said a 10- or 20-foot python also could pose a risk to an unwary human, especially a child. He added, however, "I don't think this is an imminent threat. This is not a `Be afraid, be very afraid' situation.'"
    But wait. There is something that can be done afterall. My good friend Angelo is a cop in the Tampa/Clearwater area. Since I kept all of the files from the access logs when I had the power to see them, guess what, I have everyone's IP addresses. Hmm..what can I do w/ those??
    ...

  • #2
    Kids, if you can't keep your python, don't release him in the Everglades. Do something creative with him. Kill him, eat him, stuff him and mount him on your wall, give him away to a snake loving grandmother, or release him in your ex-wife's house.

    But don't release him in the Everglades. That's a very fragile ecosystem and there's too many pythons in them swamps already.

    And do you really think you'll rest well knowing that your pet python will likely have his guts torn clean through by alligator claws? Ever seen alligator claws? Vicious, almost as nasty as the jaws. They will tear through your stomach like lunchmeat and rip it so hard it leaves blisters.
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    • #3
      According to the park people, the gators and pythons have tied up the series.

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      • #4
        Godspeed, python?

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        • #5
          That's not a very clear picture. Which one's the gator and which one's the python?

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          • #6
            you've got a pet, you've got a responsibility!

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            • #7
              so I guess I have to figure out somewhere other than the everglades to release my dog if I get tired of him? he would be killin gators and pythons all over the place.
              Sometimes elections have positive consequences!

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              • #8
                QUOTE(cardinalgirl @ Oct 5 2005, 04:47 PM) Quoted post

                so I guess I have to figure out somewhere other than the everglades to release my dog if I get tired of him? he would be killin gators and pythons all over the place.
                [/b][/quote]

                Like anyone's ever said, "Oh my god, whatch out for that killer POODLE!!!"

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                • #9
                  QUOTE(Dr.Gonzo @ Oct 5 2005, 04:48 PM) Quoted post

                  QUOTE(cardinalgirl @ Oct 5 2005, 04:47 PM) Quoted post

                  so I guess I have to figure out somewhere other than the everglades to release my dog if I get tired of him? he would be killin gators and pythons all over the place.
                  [/b][/quote]

                  Like anyone's ever said, "Oh my god, whatch out for that killer POODLE!!!"
                  [/b][/quote]
                  you mean HELLCAT POODLE....from, uhh,....hell or wherever.
                  Sometimes elections have positive consequences!

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                  • #10
                    Acid reflux.
                    Damn these electric sex pants!

                    26+31+34+42+44+46+64+67+82+06 = 10

                    Bring back the death penalty for corporations!

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                    • #11
                      I think you gotta applaud the python's effort.

                      Same thing happened to me eating a Monster Burger at Hardee's.
                      "There are only two ways to live your life. One is as though nothing is a miracle. The other is as though everything is a miracle."
                      --Albert Einstein

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                      • #12


                        Please do not release this beast into the Everglades.
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                        • #13
                          I wonder if the gator's ability to hold its breath was a factor.

                          The python may have strangled the gator for a period of time that would kill its normal prey. Since gators can stay submerged for long periods of time (help me out here gator experts -- 20 minutes?) the snake may have assumed the gator was dead only to find it regain consciousness after swalling it. The revived gator tried an exit via the chest a la Alien.

                          Surprise.
                          "I am for truth no matter who says it. I am for justice no matter who it is for or against."...Malcom X

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                          • #14
                            QUOTE(GloveSaveandaBeauty @ Oct 5 2005, 04:37 PM) Quoted post

                            That's not a very clear picture. Which one's the gator and which one's the python?
                            [/b][/quote]

                            the back half is the python, the top is the python, the front is the gator...
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                            • #15
                              QUOTE(Jaws @ Oct 5 2005, 05:34 PM) Quoted post

                              I wonder if the gator's ability to hold its breath was a factor.

                              The python may have strangled the gator for a period of time that would kill its normal prey. Since gators can stay submerged for long periods of time (help me out here gator experts -- 20 minutes?) the snake may have assumed the gator was dead only to find it regain consciousness after swalling it. The revived gator tried an exit via the chest a la Alien.

                              Surprise.
                              [/b][/quote]

                              Crocodiles can submerge and remain underwater for a variety of reasons. In most voluntary dives, crocodiles stay underwater for between 10 to 15 minutes. If the crocodile is trying to hide from a threat, dive length may be longer, up to 30 minutes or more. Most crocodiles can actually remain underwater up to 2 hours if pressed.

                              During this time, heart rate can drop to 2 or 3 beats per minute to help reduce oxygen consumption. It has also been shown that during such prolonged dives, oxygen consumption immediately after diving actually falls as the dive continues. In essence, the animal adjusts its oxygen consumption to enable it to dive for longer. Although the lungs can be used as a reserve air supply, in most cases when the crocodile dives quickly it expels the majority of air from its lungs. The crocodilian heart comes into play here, with valves closing to redirect blood to essential areas, and restrict its flow into non-essential areas - thus contributing to the reduced oxygen consumption that is seen. Crocodilian blood is also remarkable in its affinity for oxygen, carrying more in oxygen rich areas, and releasing it more quickly in oxygen deprived areas.
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