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Where have all the protest songs gone, long time passing?

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  • Where have all the protest songs gone, long time passing?

    Where have all the protest songs gone, long time passing?

    QUOTE
    The anti-war movement needs music.

    The shaking windows and rattling walls in 2005 reverberate from ever-stronger percussions about what the United States is doing — or not — at home and abroad. Flashbacks to 1968 haunt the moment. A boomer would be remiss — and dismissed — if she were to say that the '00s are the '60s reincarnate. But the uncertainty, anger, fear, outrage and sorrows spawned by the mad rush of events make 2005 feel like the defining year 1968 circling back on itself.

    The ethos proves itself inescapable in a place like the American Friends Service Committee exhibit "Eyes Wide Open," spread on the sloping west lawn at the College of St. Catherine in St. Paul today and Saturday. In row on row, pairs of combat boots represent the members of the U.S. military who have fallen in Iraq. Hugging next to these sentinels of sorrow, a circle of boots from Upper Midwest fatalities are grouped so the visitor can grasp a feeling for the 113 of our children, parents, neighbors who have died in Iraq. Combat boots, 1,928 pair in all. The unknown number of civilian casualties have notice in winding rows that circle, then spill down the hillside, some with names attached, some small, some stylish. Walk along and you might find a pair like one in your closet, as I did Thursday.

    The great marches against the American war in Vietnam echo now, too. Last week, Washington filled with protest. This week, protesters provoked their own arrest outside the White House.

    The whole world is watching, as it did in the 1968 uprisings from the streets of Prague, Paris, Chicago …. But where now are the sounds as good as those of John Fogerty, Bob Dylan, the young Joan Baez? Pete Seeger? Peter, Paul and Mary? Where are the successors to John Lennon's "Revolution" and "Give Peace a Chance?"

    Where's the new music to march by, to rally with? Where are the metaphors that move words into human action?

    Now we get unimaginative echoes by artists who might not even know where "Fortunate Son" came from for their allusions to President Bush. Now we get punked-up and hip-hopped by plugging individually into iPods but we have no authentic new voice for the streets.

    In the Martin Scorsese documentary "No Direction Home" about Dylan, Studs Terkel is heard interviewing Dylan. Terkel says, "All your songs are about more than the event."

    In the same film, Baez explains those times, "We really thought that as songwriters, we were going to change the world."

    They did.

    Back in the day, music raised wrath that poured out of concerts, records and radios onto the streets, inspiring the civil rights movement and challenging the U.S. government's unjust prosecution of war in Southeast Asia.

    In this day, the best of younger generations that we have is Green Day, Bad Religion and Lagwagon.

    Yes, rockers are still doing good in the world, bringing their celebrity to social causes and urgent relief efforts. But awareness and fund raising, while needed in this battered world, are not the same as generating music that raises collective hell. Bob Geldof, rocker-turned-humanitarian, says in the TV film on protest and pop music, "Get Up, Stand Up," that Dylan's "explosion of ideas" in song "entered the culture as a way to articulate whole political ideas."

    The year 2005 needs songs to guide the feet, to hold to the heart, to articulate whole political ideas that challenge hubris as a foreign policy and plutocracy-enrichment as domestic policy. New songs. Songs that take their heritage seriously, as did the protest songs of the 1960s and 1970s.

    Is there not in the mind of a musical artist just one anthem as great as "We Shall Overcome?"[/b][/quote]

    Masters Of War.

    Come you masters of war
    You that build all the guns
    You that build the death planes
    You that build the big bombs
    You that hide behind walls
    You that hide behind desks
    I just want you to know
    I can see through your masks

    You that never done nothin'
    But build to destroy
    You play with my world
    Like it's your little toy
    You put a gun in my hand
    And you hide from my eyes
    And you turn and run farther
    When the fast bullets fly

    Like Judas of old
    You lie and deceive
    A world war can be won
    You want me to believe
    But I see through your eyes
    And I see through your brain
    Like I see through the water
    That runs down my drain

    You fasten the triggers
    For the others to fire
    Then you set back and watch
    When the death count gets higher
    You hide in your mansion
    As young people's blood
    Flows out of their bodies
    And is buried in the mud

    You've thrown the worst fear
    That can ever be hurled
    Fear to bring children
    Into the world
    For threatening my baby
    Unborn and unnamed
    You ain't worth the blood
    That runs in your veins

    How much do I know
    To talk out of turn
    You might say that I'm young
    You might say I'm unlearned
    But there's one thing I know
    Though I'm younger than you
    Even Jesus would never
    Forgive what you do

    Let me ask you one question
    Is your money that good
    Will it buy you forgiveness
    Do you think that it could
    I think you will find
    When your death takes its toll
    All the money you made
    Will never buy back your soul

    And I hope that you die
    And your death'll come soon
    I will follow your casket
    In the pale afternoon
    And I'll watch while you're lowered
    Down to your deathbed
    And I'll stand o'er your grave
    'Til I'm sure that you're dead

  • #2
    QUOTE(thetorch @ Oct 2 2005, 08:32 PM) Quoted post

    Where have all the protest songs gone, long time passing?

    QUOTE
    The anti-war movement needs music.

    The shaking windows and rattling walls in 2005 reverberate from ever-stronger percussions about what the United States is doing — or not — at home and abroad. Flashbacks to 1968 haunt the moment. A boomer would be remiss — and dismissed — if she were to say that the '00s are the '60s reincarnate. But the uncertainty, anger, fear, outrage and sorrows spawned by the mad rush of events make 2005 feel like the defining year 1968 circling back on itself.

    The ethos proves itself inescapable in a place like the American Friends Service Committee exhibit "Eyes Wide Open," spread on the sloping west lawn at the College of St. Catherine in St. Paul today and Saturday. In row on row, pairs of combat boots represent the members of the U.S. military who have fallen in Iraq. Hugging next to these sentinels of sorrow, a circle of boots from Upper Midwest fatalities are grouped so the visitor can grasp a feeling for the 113 of our children, parents, neighbors who have died in Iraq. Combat boots, 1,928 pair in all. The unknown number of civilian casualties have notice in winding rows that circle, then spill down the hillside, some with names attached, some small, some stylish. Walk along and you might find a pair like one in your closet, as I did Thursday.

    The great marches against the American war in Vietnam echo now, too. Last week, Washington filled with protest. This week, protesters provoked their own arrest outside the White House.

    The whole world is watching, as it did in the 1968 uprisings from the streets of Prague, Paris, Chicago …. But where now are the sounds as good as those of John Fogerty, Bob Dylan, the young Joan Baez? Pete Seeger? Peter, Paul and Mary? Where are the successors to John Lennon's "Revolution" and "Give Peace a Chance?"

    Where's the new music to march by, to rally with? Where are the metaphors that move words into human action?

    Now we get unimaginative echoes by artists who might not even know where "Fortunate Son" came from for their allusions to President Bush. Now we get punked-up and hip-hopped by plugging individually into iPods but we have no authentic new voice for the streets.

    In the Martin Scorsese documentary "No Direction Home" about Dylan, Studs Terkel is heard interviewing Dylan. Terkel says, "All your songs are about more than the event."

    In the same film, Baez explains those times, "We really thought that as songwriters, we were going to change the world."

    They did.

    Back in the day, music raised wrath that poured out of concerts, records and radios onto the streets, inspiring the civil rights movement and challenging the U.S. government's unjust prosecution of war in Southeast Asia.

    In this day, the best of younger generations that we have is Green Day, Bad Religion and Lagwagon.

    Yes, rockers are still doing good in the world, bringing their celebrity to social causes and urgent relief efforts. But awareness and fund raising, while needed in this battered world, are not the same as generating music that raises collective hell. Bob Geldof, rocker-turned-humanitarian, says in the TV film on protest and pop music, "Get Up, Stand Up," that Dylan's "explosion of ideas" in song "entered the culture as a way to articulate whole political ideas."

    The year 2005 needs songs to guide the feet, to hold to the heart, to articulate whole political ideas that challenge hubris as a foreign policy and plutocracy-enrichment as domestic policy. New songs. Songs that take their heritage seriously, as did the protest songs of the 1960s and 1970s.

    Is there not in the mind of a musical artist just one anthem as great as "We Shall Overcome?"[/b][/quote]

    Masters Of War.

    Come you masters of war
    You that build all the guns
    You that build the death planes
    You that build the big bombs
    You that hide behind walls
    You that hide behind desks
    I just want you to know
    I can see through your masks

    You that never done nothin'
    But build to destroy
    You play with my world
    Like it's your little toy
    You put a gun in my hand
    And you hide from my eyes
    And you turn and run farther
    When the fast bullets fly

    Like Judas of old
    You lie and deceive
    A world war can be won
    You want me to believe
    But I see through your eyes
    And I see through your brain
    Like I see through the water
    That runs down my drain

    You fasten the triggers
    For the others to fire
    Then you set back and watch
    When the death count gets higher
    You hide in your mansion
    As young people's blood
    Flows out of their bodies
    And is buried in the mud

    You've thrown the worst fear
    That can ever be hurled
    Fear to bring children
    Into the world
    For threatening my baby
    Unborn and unnamed
    You ain't worth the blood
    That runs in your veins

    How much do I know
    To talk out of turn
    You might say that I'm young
    You might say I'm unlearned
    But there's one thing I know
    Though I'm younger than you
    Even Jesus would never
    Forgive what you do

    Let me ask you one question
    Is your money that good
    Will it buy you forgiveness
    Do you think that it could
    I think you will find
    When your death takes its toll
    All the money you made
    Will never buy back your soul

    And I hope that you die
    And your death'll come soon
    I will follow your casket
    In the pale afternoon
    And I'll watch while you're lowered
    Down to your deathbed
    And I'll stand o'er your grave
    'Til I'm sure that you're dead
    [/b][/quote]
    Eddie Vedder's rendition of Masters of War is fucking awesome. Better than Dylan's. And I love Dylan. Check it out if you haven't heard it.
    --Official Lounge Sponsor of Coach Mike Anderson, Colby Rasmus, and Pearl Jam.
    --Suck it cubbies.
    --Thanks to RBB for my kick ace avatar!!** --RETIRE #51!!!

    Comment


    • #3
      I have heard several renditions by Pearl Jam. I like Dylan's better.

      Comment

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