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  • Curry's DNA fight w/ Bulls 'bigger than sports'

    QUOTE
    Curry's DNA fight with Bulls 'bigger than sports world'
    By Jim Litke
    Associated Press

    CHICAGO -- Until last spring, Eddy Curry was just another cautionary tale about kids drafted before their time.

    The Chicago Bulls plucked the 6-foot-11 manchild out of high school in 2001, and he played his first three seasons more flabby than feared. But Curry showed up for the final year of his rookie contract 40 pounds lighter, converted some of that enormous potential into production, and made the Bulls think they might yet see a return on their considerable investment.

    Then, before a March 30 game at Charlotte, Curry's heart skipped a few beats.

    And then, a few more.

    Nearly six months later, after a diagnosis of benign arrythmia sent the 22-year-old scurrying to cardiologists from coast to coast and cost him the rest of the season, Curry finds himself in a fight with Bulls management his lawyer calls "far bigger than just the sports world."

    At issue is the one-year, $5 million deal Chicago offered Curry, with this proviso: before he sets foot on the court, Curry must submit to DNA testing.

    "Think about what's at stake here," said Alan Milstein, Curry's attorney. "As far as DNA testing, we're just at the beginning of that universe. Pretty soon, though, we'll know whether someone is predisposed to cancer, alcoholism, obesity, baldness and who knows what else.

    "Hand that information to an employer," he added, "and imagine the implications. If the NBA were to get away with it, what about everyone else in this country looking for a job."

    Chicago general manager John Paxson insists the Bulls can test Curry as part of a routine physical when training camp opens next week. Milstein calls that notion "flat-out wrong," and one already rejected by the players' union during the last collective bargaining agreement.

    "Besides, there are privacy laws on the books, both state and federal, so there's no way they'd win," he added. "It makes you wonder what they're really worried about."

    Milstein isn't the only one asking. Miami Heat forward Antoine Walker, like Curry a Chicago native, played pickup games alongside the youngster the last three weeks, and the dispute has him shaking his head.

    "He looked fine, but a lot of teams seem concerned with risks nowadays. Maybe because the investments in players have become so big," Walker said. "Maybe the Bulls want Eddy long-term, and maybe this is some kind of bargaining chip. Either way, DNA testing is taking things a little too far."

    Paxson says the team's only motive is to learn whether Curry's genetic makeup leaves him susceptible to cardiomyopathy, a heart condition that combined with arrythmia, could prove fatal. He said the DNA test was suggested by Barry Maron, a world-renowned specialist in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and complained the team's stance is unfairly being portrayed as though "we have some other motive.

    "The bottom line," Paxson added, "is if Eddy had not had any incident and a doctor hadn't suggested it, we wouldn't be asking for it."

    Curry has already been cleared to play by several prominent cardiologists, but he can't get disability insurance for his contract should he be sidelined again -- or worse -- with heart problems.

    "There's one guy who isn't sure," Curry told the Chicago Tribune on Tuesday, making his first comments in a while. "I can live with that because of what the other doctors say."

    If this was a private medical dispute, chances are the hype would be less and the stakes lower. But because of the liability issues, Curry's high profile, and the value a healthy, motivated big man can command in the NBA marketplace, it's become an expensive, mean-spirited mess.

    Besides arguing over medial opinions and the science underpinning DNA testing, both camps have recently invoked the deaths of former Celtics star Reggie Lewis and Loyola Marymount's Hank Gathers. Both suffered from hypertrophic cardiomyopathy when they collapsed and died; what the Bulls and Curry's advisers disagree over is whether he is treading the same path.

    "My best guess?" Milstein said. "Eddy shows up at camp, refuses the test, we go to arbitration and the arbitrator tells the Bulls they simply can't compel him. We'll find out soon enough."

    That's what scares Jerome Stanley, Lewis' agent. He recalled the ride through Boston with Lewis' family in a limousine on the way to the funeral as one of the toughest things he ever had to do. Stanley said Tuesday he wishes now that DNA testing had been an option.

    "I've seen this movie before," he said. "Eddy Curry and his family and his agent do not believe he can drop dead and die. You know what? He can drop dead and die. It goes just like that.

    "If I'm the team, let the insurance be your guide," Stanley said. "The insurance won't insure it, that should tell you something. They've got the biggest group of risk managers.

    "Now maybe they're wrong," he added. "But if you lose the bet, you don't just lose the player. The player dies."[/b][/quote]

    "Can't buy what I want because it's free...
    Can't buy what I want because it's free..."
    -- Pearl Jam, from the single Corduroy

  • #2
    WOW, you knew it was coming some day.

    And where will it end? Will big companies get copies of your DNA before they hire you? Looking for stuff that may cost them more in insurance?

    This may be the slippery slope of slippery slopes.



    This should be the most viewed thread.
    Be passionate about what you believe in, or why bother.

    Comment


    • #3
      QUOTE(madyaks @ Sep 28 2005, 11:48 PM) Quoted post

      WOW, you knew it was coming some day.

      And where will it end? Will big companies get copies of your DNA before they hire you? Looking for stuff that may cost them more in insurance?

      This may be the slippery slope of slippery slopes.



      This should be the most viewed thread.
      [/b][/quote]

      A better answer would be to write the contract with less guaranteed money.

      I actually agree that this is a slippery slope.
      "Need some wood?" -- George W. Bush, October 8, 2004

      "Historians will judge if this war is just, not your punk ass." -- Dave Glover, December 8, 2004

      Comment


      • #4
        "Bob, your DNA is looking a little fucked up, so we cant hire you. Our group insurance rates will go up. Sorry and good luck!"
        “I’ve always stated, ‘I’m a Missouri Tiger,’” Anderson said March 13 after Arkansas fired John Pelphrey, adding, “I’m excited about what’s taking place here.”

        Asked then if he would talk to his players about the situation, he said, “They know me, and that’s where the trust comes in.

        Comment


        • #5
          I thought the topic was 'Curry's fight w/Belly bigger than Barkley's ever was'..... [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/laugh.gif[/img]

          While I hope nothing fatally wrong happens to the kid, he's not really that good of a ballplayer. When you are 7 ft, 290+, you have no excuse to average less than 10 boards per game....I don't care if he was only playing 30 minutes per game....get in better shape then so you can play more than half a game.

          That's ten minutes less than a college game....he's been in the league for what, 4 years now? Time to nut up.

          He should look on the brightside - at least he's not Kwame Brown.
          'Ah, to be a bird. To fly the skies, sing your song, and best of all, occassionally pluck someone's eyes out.' - George Carlin.

          Comment


          • #6
            The kid can score inside, but you are right, he sucks on D and the boards, which is probably a direct correlation to not being in as good of shape as he ought to be in. He fouls alot also, another sign of a player that is out of shape.
            “I’ve always stated, ‘I’m a Missouri Tiger,’” Anderson said March 13 after Arkansas fired John Pelphrey, adding, “I’m excited about what’s taking place here.”

            Asked then if he would talk to his players about the situation, he said, “They know me, and that’s where the trust comes in.

            Comment


            • #7
              this makes me think. I am supprised Torch did not post this

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              • #8
                QUOTE
                Stern backs Bulls in DNA testing of Curry
                ESPN.com news services

                NBA commissioner David Stern told SI.com he understands both sides of the Eddy Curry DNA testing controversy, but he said he doesn't see any harm in a team asking for the test, given the financial commitment given to the player.

                The Chicago Bulls want to test the 22-year-old center who has been sidelined since March with heart arryhythmia, to see if his medical condition could be fatal. Curry has been negotiating a new contract with the team and declined the test on the grounds that it would enable the team to search for other pre-existing medical conditions that could hurt the value of his contract.

                Stern suggested to SI.com that the teams do the testing in rookie camp: "Let's put it back in rookie camp. If you're thinking about drafting a player, you do blood [tests], you do X-rays, skeletal, you look for scars, for breaks, for weaknesses, for disease. I don't know what you would be looking for with DNAs, but given the size of the contract and the importance of the draft pick, I think that diagnostic testing that tells you whether you're making a good investment is not a bad idea."

                Stern also said safeguards should be in place to ensure the results of DNA testing are controlled by the player.

                "Always," Stern told SI.com. "It should only be dispersed with the consent of the player. I guess the player, for limited purposes, can make it available to the team, but I'm a firm believer in medical privacy."

                If the Bulls and Curry cannot come to an agreement on the testing, the conflct may end up in arbitration with the players union representing Curry, SI.com said.

                The Bulls are scheduled to report for training camp next week. [/b][/quote]

                "Can't buy what I want because it's free...
                Can't buy what I want because it's free..."
                -- Pearl Jam, from the single Corduroy

                Comment


                • #9
                  How is a DNA test fundamentally any different that a physical?


                  All it is is another means of assessing risk for a more accurate evaluation of player worth.

                  If a guy has a gimpy knee it doesn't mean he won't get a contract and it doesn't mean his knee's going to give out. It simply means that he's at a higher risk for a knee injury....and his contract would reflect that.


                  Basically, this is really a non-issue.
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                  • #10
                    QUOTE(BringBackZezel @ Sep 30 2005, 11:53 AM) Quoted post

                    How is a DNA test fundamentally any different that a physical?


                    All it is is another means of assessing risk for a more accurate evaluation of player worth.

                    If a guy has a gimpy knee it doesn't mean he won't get a contract and it doesn't mean his knee's going to give out. It simply means that he's at a higher risk for a knee injury....and his contract would reflect that.


                    Basically, this is really a non-issue.
                    [/b][/quote]


                    Yeah until your boss gets a hold of your sample and fires you because it shows you have a good chance of getting some disease that is going to cost the companies insurance company millions in treatment.
                    Be passionate about what you believe in, or why bother.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      QUOTE(madyaks @ Sep 30 2005, 12:07 PM) Quoted post

                      QUOTE(BringBackZezel @ Sep 30 2005, 11:53 AM) Quoted post

                      How is a DNA test fundamentally any different that a physical?


                      All it is is another means of assessing risk for a more accurate evaluation of player worth.

                      If a guy has a gimpy knee it doesn't mean he won't get a contract and it doesn't mean his knee's going to give out. It simply means that he's at a higher risk for a knee injury....and his contract would reflect that.


                      Basically, this is really a non-issue.
                      [/b][/quote]


                      Yeah until your boss gets a hold of your sample and fires you because it shows you have a good chance of getting some disease that is going to cost the companies insurance company millions in treatment.
                      [/b][/quote]

                      1. I'm not a contract worker.
                      2. I'm not required to take a physical.
                      3. I'm not a professional athlete.


                      It's completely idiotic to extrapolate that in allowing this for professional athletes that it will end up in other fields.

                      A better comparison is this: When you go in for a job interview you usually give them your resume. In addition, some places will ask for references. Some places call the references to check on the person.

                      calling references : most workers :: DNA testing : Professional Athletes

                      It's simply another means of assessing whether you want the prospective employee working for you as well as how much the employee is worth.

                      It's really a non-issue.
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