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AQ's # 2 Man in Iraq Killed

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  • AQ's # 2 Man in Iraq Killed

    Just fyi.

    QUOTE
    WASHINGTON — U.S. Special Forces killed Al Qaeda's (search) No. 2 terror mastermind in Iraq (search), Defense Department officials said.

    FOX News has confirmed that Abu Azzam (search), who was believed to have been in charge of the financing of terrorist cells in the war-torn country, was killed during a raid in Baghdad early Monday morning Iraq time. Azzam is thought to be the top deputy to Abu Musab al-Zarqawi (search), Iraq's most wanted terrorist.

    Azzam is the latest in a series of top Zarqawi deputies that have been killed or captured by coalition forces in recent months. Zarqawi's Al Qaeda in Iraq (search) group has taken responsibility for some of the country's most horrific acts of terror including car bombings, kidnappings and beheadings of Iraqi civilians and westerners.

    Earlier this month Zarqawi, a Sunni Muslim, pledged war on Iraqi Shiites in response to the U.S. and Iraqi military offensive on the town of Tal Afar near the Syrian border.

    The U.S. military said it is continuing to make progress dismantling Zarqawi's operations. Officials credit much of the success to the increasing number of tips coming from Iraqi civilians. A top U.S. commander in northwestern region of the country said that 80 percent the terror network has been affected by coalition operations in his region.[/b][/quote]

    http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,170467,00.html
    "You can't handle my opinions." Moedrabowsky

    Jeffro is a hell of a good man.

    "A liberal is a man too broadminded to take his own side in a quarrel." - Robert Frost

  • #2
    QUOTE(FAR52 @ Sep 27 2005, 09:30 AM) Quoted post

    Just fyi.

    QUOTE
    WASHINGTON — U.S. Special Forces killed Al Qaeda's (search) No. 2 terror mastermind in Iraq (search), Defense Department officials said.

    FOX News has confirmed that Abu Azzam (search), who was believed to have been in charge of the financing of terrorist cells in the war-torn country, was killed during a raid in Baghdad early Monday morning Iraq time. Azzam is thought to be the top deputy to Abu Musab al-Zarqawi (search), Iraq's most wanted terrorist.

    Azzam is the latest in a series of top Zarqawi deputies that have been killed or captured by coalition forces in recent months. Zarqawi's Al Qaeda in Iraq (search) group has taken responsibility for some of the country's most horrific acts of terror including car bombings, kidnappings and beheadings of Iraqi civilians and westerners.

    Earlier this month Zarqawi, a Sunni Muslim, pledged war on Iraqi Shiites in response to the U.S. and Iraqi military offensive on the town of Tal Afar near the Syrian border.

    The U.S. military said it is continuing to make progress dismantling Zarqawi's operations. Officials credit much of the success to the increasing number of tips coming from Iraqi civilians. A top U.S. commander in northwestern region of the country said that 80 percent the terror network has been affected by coalition operations in his region.[/b][/quote]

    http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,170467,00.html
    [/b][/quote]
    If fox says it it must be true!


    j/k

    Official Sponsor of Marco Gonzales and the Productive Out!!!


    Said the Quangle Wangle Quee

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    • #3
      QUOTE(jhanke @ Sep 27 2005, 09:54 AM) Quoted post

      If fox says it it must be true!


      j/k
      [/b][/quote]

      Well, if you would prefer, here is the article from CNN:

      QUOTE
      Al Qaeda in Iraq's No. 2 operative was killed during a raid by coalition and Iraqi forces, a U.S. Defense Department official said Tuesday.[/b][/quote]

      http://www.cnn.com/2005/WORLD/meast/09/27/...main/index.html

      Does that help?
      "You can't handle my opinions." Moedrabowsky

      Jeffro is a hell of a good man.

      "A liberal is a man too broadminded to take his own side in a quarrel." - Robert Frost

      Comment


      • #4
        I don't care who says it, I'm glad the mother fucker is dead.
        RIP Chris Jones 1971-2009
        You'll never be forgotten.

        Comment


        • #5
          So who moves up? LSU?
          Dude. Can. Fly.

          Comment


          • #6
            [img]style_emoticons/<#EMO_DIR#>/biggrin.gif[/img] Wonder how much longer he's going to wait on those virgins he was promised.
            June 9, 1973 - The day athletic perfection was defined.

            http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=k-Kva...eature=related

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            • #7
              We keep getting #2. Let's get that #1 mofo baster
              Official sponsor of Mike Shannon's Retirement Party

              Comment


              • #8
                I look at this as a great sign for Mizzou this weekend vs. UT.
                Dude. Can. Fly.

                Comment


                • #9
                  With our intelligence, coupled with our military power and prowess, it's amazing that we haven't caught #1 yet.

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                  • #10
                    QUOTE(ElviswasaBluesFan @ Sep 27 2005, 11:26 AM) Quoted post

                    We keep getting #2. Let's get that #1 mofo baster
                    [/b][/quote]


                    I am more confident we will catch this #1 mofo baster than the one in Afghanistan/Pak.

                    I think a public beheading is in order.
                    Dude. Can. Fly.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      QUOTE(dvyyyyyy @ Sep 27 2005, 11:37 AM) Quoted post

                      QUOTE(ElviswasaBluesFan @ Sep 27 2005, 11:26 AM) Quoted post

                      We keep getting #2. Let's get that #1 mofo baster
                      [/b][/quote]


                      I am more confident we will catch this #1 mofo baster than the one in Afghanistan/Pak.

                      I think a public beheading is in order.
                      [/b][/quote]
                      In the most public manor possible.

                      Let's bulldoze Greenland in the name of justice (sorry, bastards) and have a pay-per view global broadcast of him being skinned alive and dipped in the following substances:
                      Citrus juice
                      Salt

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                      • #12
                        QUOTE
                        The 'Second' Man
                        The slain Abu Azzam may not have been Zarqawi’s top deputy after all. Will his death have any effect on the Iraq insurgency?

                        WEB EXCLUSIVE
                        By Michael Isikoff and Mark Hosenball
                        Newsweek
                        Updated: 4:31 p.m. ET Sept. 28, 2005


                        Sept. 28, 2005 - U.S. intelligence officials and counterterrorism analysts are questioning whether a slain terrorist—described by President Bush today as the “second-most-wanted Al Qaeda leader in Iraq”—was as significant a figure as the Bush administration is claiming.

                        In a brief Rose Garden appearance Wednesday morning, Bush seized on the killing of Abu Azzam by joint U.S-Iraqi forces in a shootout last Sunday as fresh evidence that the United States is turning the tide against the Iraqi insurgency.

                        “This guy was a brutal killer,” Bush told reporters in remarks that were also carried live on cable TV. “He was one of [Abu Mussab al-]Zarqawi’s top lieutenants. He was reported to be the top operational commander of Al Qaeda in Baghdad.”

                        Bush’s comments came one day after Gen. Richard Myers, the outgoing chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, told reporters at the Pentagon that the U.S. military considered Abu Azzam the “No. 2 Al Qaeda operative in Iraq, next to Zarqawi.”

                        But veteran counterterrorism analyst Evan Kohlmann said today there are ample reasons to question whether Abu Azzam was really the No. 2 figure in the Iraqi insurgency. He noted that U.S. officials have made similar claims about a string of purportedly high-ranking terrorist operatives who had been captured or killed in the past, even though these alleged successes made no discernible dent in the intensity of the insurgency.

                        “If I had a nickel for every No. 2 and No. 3 they’ve arrested or killed in Iraq and Afghanistan, I’d be a millionaire,” says Kohlmann, a New York-based analyst who tracks the Iraq insurgency and who first expressed skepticism about the Azzam claims in a posting on The Counterterrorism Blog (counterterror.typepad.com). While agreeing that Azzam—also known as Abdullah Najim Abdullah Mohamed al-Jawari—may have been an important figure, “this guy was not the deputy commander of Al Qaeda,” says Kohlmann.

                        Three U.S. counterterrorism officials, who asked not to be identified because of the sensitivity of the subject, also told NEWSWEEK today that U.S. agencies did not really consider Abu Azzam to be Zarqawi’s “deputy” even if he did play a relatively high-ranking role in the insurgency.

                        The characterization of Abu Azzam as No. 2 to Zarqawi is “not quite accurate,” said one of the officials. According to this official, it would be more correct to describe Abu Azzam as a “top lieutenant” to Zarqawi who was involved in “running” terrorist operations in Baghdad—not all of Iraq. Other top lieutenants operate in other parts of the country, the official indicated.

                        Two other officials agreed that Abu Azzam was a senior figure, perhaps the emir (leader), of Al Qaeda operations in Baghdad, and that he was of critical importance in moving funds to insurgent operatives in the Iraqi capital area. “He’s a money guy,” one official said. “He is significant but not No. 2 [to Zarqawi],” said another official.


                        One reason to question the official Bush administration portrayal of Abu Azzam is that recent Al Qaeda statements and audio recordings have described another Iraqi insurgent leader—a man who goes by the nom de guerre Abu Abdelrahman al-Iraqi—as the group’s “deputy commander,” Kohlmann says. Another Iraqi national, known as Abu Usaid al-Iraqi, has been described in these statements as directly under him in the Qaeda structure as the commander of the group’s military wing. Neither man has been reported to have been captured or killed by U.S. or Iraqi forces, Kohlmann adds.

                        Even the U.S. military in recent months have seemed to attach greater significance to other figures in Zarqawi’s network. Last July, for example, Coalition forces in Iraq issued a statement asking for help in finding yet another insurgent leader—Abu Thar al-Iraqi, who was described as “Al Qaeda’s chief bombing coordinator for Baghdad.”

                        As Kohlmann sees it, the Zarqawi network in Iraq is far more amorphous and loosely structured to accurately place any particular figure in a hierarchical structure. “These aren’t Fortune 500 corporations,” he says.

                        The real question is whether taking any one figure out will really have an appreciable impact on an insurgency that seems to have shown a remarkable resiliency. For nearly two years now, U.S. officials have touted previous arrests or captures, most notably that of toppled leader Saddam Hussein in December 2003, as developments that would cripple the insurgency.

                        In January 2004, for example, the U.S. military announced the arrest in Fallajuh of Husam al-Yemeni, who was described in press accounts out of Baghdad as the “right-hand man” of Zarqawi. In November 2004, Iraqi officials announced they had arrested in Mosul a man named Abu Saaed, who was described by the Iraqi national-security adviser as Zarqawi’s “alleged lieutenant.”

                        IRAQIS NAB TOP ZARQAWI AIDE read the headline on the Fox News Web site on Jan. 24, 2005, touting the arrest of yet another man, Sami Mohammed Ali Said al-Jaaf, also known as Abu Omar al-Kurdi. The Associated Press story reporting al-Jaaf’s detention quoted a U.S. military statement describing him as the “most lethal” of Zarqawi’s lieutenants, noting that he had been linked to the August 2003 bombing of United Nations headquarters in Baghdad.

                        Yet despite the hopes of U.S. military officials, the capture of these figures had little impact on the suicide bombing attacks that have been the signature of Zarqawi’s forces. “If anything, after the capture of al-Jaaf, they went up,” said Kohlmann.

                        For what it is worth, Al Qaeda in Iraq itself denied that Abu Azzam had been second-ranking leader of the organization. In a statement posted Tuesday on the group’s Web site, the “Information Department of Al Qaeda Organization in the Land of Two Rivers” claimed that Abu Azzam al-Iraqi was a “soldier” in the Iraqi Al Qaeda organization and that he had indeed been a “leader of one of the active brigades in Baghdad.” However, according to the statement, allegations by U.S. officials that Abu Azzam was the “second man” in Iraqi Al Qaeda “are mistaken.” The statement, translated by the SITE Institute, a private research group, added: “We tell these midgets: stop saying that because it will not do any good."
                        [/b][/quote]

                        QUOTE
                        [This is] a prime example of the extent to which we're flying blind here. Zarqawi himself was not considered a major figure by the United States or anyone else before the war. It's never been clear what the nature of his pre-war relationship with Osama bin Laden was, other than that they'd communicated to some extent. Nor is it clear what the nature of their relationship is today. Zarqawi changed the name of his group to make it sound like he leads the Iraq branch of a coherently organized global al-Qaeda organization, but most people don't believe that. But nobody's sure what to believe. Nobody knows what proportion of the insurgents are loyal to Zarqawi. Nobody knows -- even in a ballpark way -- how many insurgents there are. Nobody knows how large a role Baath Party leaders still play, what that role might be, or what their thinking about the rise of Islamism in Iraq is.

                        What's more, the situation has clearly persisted long enough that we obviously lack the capacity to figure any of this out. In some ways, that's not too surprising. Suppose China occupied the United States with an army that spoke only Mandarin and tried to stamp out drug trafficking. The results would be every bit as farcical as our counterinsurgency campaign in Iraq.

                        [/b][/quote]
                        From this day forward, I no longer shall tinker with the machinery of death.

                        For more than 20 years I have endeavored-indeed, I have struggled-along with a majority of this Court, to develop procedural & substantive rules that would lend more than the mere appearance of fairness to the death penalty endeavor.


                        I feel morally and intellectually obligated simply to concede that the death penalty experiment has failed.

                        The path the Court has chosen lessens us all. I dissent.

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