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Report: Palmeiro blames teammate in probe

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  • Report: Palmeiro blames teammate in probe

    QUOTE
    Rafael Palmeiro reportedly told a three-member baseball arbitration panel that a teammate gave him a substance that might be responsible for his positive steroid test, a source told the Baltimore Sun.

    Rafael Palmeiro
    Palmeiro

    A second source told the Sun that Palmeiro named the teammate when he presented his defense when appealing his suspension. However, a source told the newspaper that while he told the panel that he had received a substance from a teammate, he didn't make the case that the substance in question caused his positive test result.

    The House Committee on Government Reform is investigating whether Palmeiro's statements to the panel have merit, the Sun reported, by interviewing people, including members of the Orioles such as Palmeiro himself and the team's head trainer, Richie Bancells.

    Bancells confirmed to the newspaper that he had spoken to the committee.

    The baseball arbitration panel denied Palmeiro's appeal, saying he failed to establish the positive test result was not his fault.

    Baseball suspended Palmeiro for 10 days and the House committee is now examining arbitration hearing transcripts to determine whether Palmeiro lied to Congress when he testified he had never taken steroids.

    Palmeiro stood by his statements to Congress, saying he didn't know what caused the test result.

    Earlier this month, the Baltimore Sun reported that the House committee is uncertain whether there is enough evidence to refer the case to the Justice Department. However, the committee is considering several other options.

    One scenario, officials familiar with the situation told the Sun, has the committee making the documents pertaining to Palmeiro's case public. The committee received the documents related to the first baseman's positive steroid test from Major League Baseball on Aug. 12. A document release could happen in the next two weeks and would allow the public to decide for itself about Palmeiro.

    The documents include the results of Palmeiro's tests, the tests' dates and the record of secret proceedings before a three-member arbitration panel after Palmeiro appealed the results. The appeal was denied, and the documents would show how Palmeiro defended himself while not offering an explanation as to how the steroid entered his system.

    The committee has also not ruled out sending the case to the Justice Department, which could bring a perjury charge against Palmeiro. But the Sun reported that that option is less likely than others because of the difficulty of proving Palmeiro had knowingly used the drug when he appeared before Congress.

    Palmeiro said that he would never take a performance-enhancing substance intentionally after he tested positive for the steroid stanozolol. However, experts have said that is is unlikely stanozolol could have entered his system by accident. Palmeiro said he won't comment publicly on the matter until Congress finishes its review.

    A congressional source familiar with the committee's work, speaking to the AP on condition of anonymity because the investigation is ongoing, said several active players have spoken or will speak with the committee. That source would not identify who was interviewed.

    But Colorado Rockies outfielder Jorge Piedra told The Associated Press that he spoke on the phone with the committee. He said investigators contacted him through his agent about a week ago, found out "all they wanted to know" in a matter of minutes and didn't plan to contact him again.

    Piedra, the second player publicly identified under the sport's new steroid rules when he was suspended for 10 days in April, said the committee "had a few questions and I just answered them honestly."

    "I told them I didn't have anything to do with Palmeiro," Piedra said after the Rockies played the Padres in Denver. "We only worked out a few times together."

    The congressional source indicated that all the players asked to talk to the committee recently were chosen because they have relationships with Palmeiro -- such as teammates or workout partners -- and could have knowledge about whether he might have used steroids before his testimony.

    Information from The Associated Press was used in this report.[/b][/quote]

    "Can't buy what I want because it's free...
    Can't buy what I want because it's free..."
    -- Pearl Jam, from the single Corduroy

  • #2
    QUOTE
    he didn't make the case that the substance in question caused his positive test result.[/b][/quote]
    Be passionate about what you believe in, or why bother.

    Comment


    • #3
      Kline

      Comment


      • #4
        QUOTE(chazzz @ Sep 22 2005, 11:11 AM) Quoted post

        Kline
        [/b][/quote]

        Corky Sosa.

        Moon

        Comment


        • #5
          the mind of Kobe strikes again

          Comment


          • #6
            Apparently the interim manager of the Orioles says Raffy's no longer welcome.

            http://sports.espn.go.com/mlb/news/story?id=2169549
            Official sponsor of the St. Louis Cardinals

            "This is a heavyweight bout indeed."--John Rooney, Oct. 27, 2011

            Comment


            • #7
              SportsCenter is reporting the teammate was Tejada.


              Comment


              • #8
                Palmeiro blamed Miguel Tejada for giving him a b-12 vitamin....

                "Can't buy what I want because it's free...
                Can't buy what I want because it's free..."
                -- Pearl Jam, from the single Corduroy

                Comment


                • #9
                  QUOTE(*007* @ Sep 23 2005, 12:12 AM) Quoted post

                  Palmeiro blamed Miguel Tejada for giving him a b-12 vitamin....
                  [/b][/quote]

                  Should have stuck to Riboflavin.

                  Or Niacin. Niacin's good.


                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Well, it makes sense. How many shortstops consistently hit 30 hr and drive in 120 runs?

                    Nice to see how classy a guy Raffy is too. Take everyone down with ya, pal.

                    Moon

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      QUOTE(Moon Man @ Sep 22 2005, 11:14 PM) Quoted post

                      Well, it makes sense. How many shortstops consistently hit 30 hr and drive in 120 runs?

                      Nice to see how classy a guy Raffy is too. Take everyone down with ya, pal.

                      Moon
                      [/b][/quote]
                      Yeah, that big, bad B-12 vitamin will take out scores of MLBers....

                      Weak attempt @ Palmeiro for even trying to pass the blame on anyone but himself...

                      "Can't buy what I want because it's free...
                      Can't buy what I want because it's free..."
                      -- Pearl Jam, from the single Corduroy

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Sweet Jesus. B-12? It's a fucking vitamin.

                        Palmeiro will never play in the big leagues again. No one will touch him.
                        Official sponsor of the St. Louis Cardinals

                        "This is a heavyweight bout indeed."--John Rooney, Oct. 27, 2011

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Official sponsor of the St. Louis Cardinals

                          "This is a heavyweight bout indeed."--John Rooney, Oct. 27, 2011

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            QUOTE
                            Source: Palmeiro named Tejada before panel
                            ESPN.com news services

                            Rafael Palmeiro told baseball's arbitration panel that a vitamin he received from Baltimore Orioles teammate Miguel Tejada might have caused his positive test for steroid use.

                            Palmeiro testified that he received B-12 from Tejada, a person familiar with the grievance hearing told The Associated Press Thursday on condition of anonymity because the proceedings were secret. However, Orioles executive vice president Jim Beattie denied that Tejada supplied steroids to Palmeiro.

                            "Miggy [Tejada] is cleared in any implication that he provided steroids to Palmeiro," Beattie said in a statement. "That was investigated by HHPAC [House Health Policy Advisory Committee], and just to be sure they tested the stuff that Miggy had. It was found to be the B-12. That cleared it. End of story."

                            Beattie also said that Palmeiro would issue a statement later Thursday denying that he accused Tejada of giving him a substance that may have caused a positive steroids test.

                            The Washington Post reported Thursday night that a substance given to MLB's governing body on steroids was tested three times and determined to be B-12

                            "Right now I'm in shock," Tejada, a former American League MVP, said after Baltimore lost to the New York Yankees on Thursday night. "I've never given anybody steroids before. I've been checked out three times already, and I'm clean. I've been clean all my life."

                            Tejada said he gave Palmeiro the B-12 "a long time ago."

                            "It doesn't bother me because I'm not guilty. I've done nothing wrong. I just gave him B-12, and B-12 is legal," Tejada said. "You don't get caught for B-12."

                            Vitamin B-12 helps maintain healthy nerve cells and red blood cells and is commonly found in foods such as fish, meat, poultry and dairy products.

                            Palmeiro has not publicly discussed details of his testimony, which came during an unsuccessful grievance filed by the players' association to overturn his 10-day suspension, which followed a positive test for stanozolol.

                            His lawyers, Mayer, Brown, Rowe and Maw LLP, issued a statement Thursday night saying they "are disturbed about the misleading reports being leaked by unnamed sources who claim knowledge of the investigation."

                            "Rafael Palmeiro has never implicated any player in the intentional use or distribution of steroids, or any other illegal substance, in any interview or testimony," the statement said.

                            According to the person familiar with the investigation, Palmeiro listed the B-12 as a possible reason for the positive test but did not make any definitive accusation.

                            Before the game, Orioles interim manager Sam Perlozzo said that if the first baseman had named a teammate in trying to explain his steroid test, it probably would be best that Palmeiro not return to the team this year.

                            "If in fact that was true, then it probably would not be a good idea" for Palmeiro to return, Perlozzo said. "It's all speculation as far as I know."

                            Congressional investigators have been interviewing the Orioles following Palmeiro's 10-day suspension, which began Aug. 1. Palmeiro went 2-for-26 with one RBI after his return and was sent home by Baltimore on Sept. 5 for rehabilitation on his right knee and left ankle.

                            "I know that he still would like to come back," Perlozzo said. "He doesn't want to be a distraction and all that. I pretty much told him that as far as I was concerned, it was an organizational decision."

                            Beattie said no decision would be made until Friday at the earliest.

                            "We're talking to Raffy right now about that," Beattie said in a telephone interview, saying he didn't want to "comment on hearsay."

                            Perlozzo didn't discuss with Palmeiro what he may or may not have told the panel.

                            "I did not ask him," he said. "I didn't think that was my job."

                            Palmeiro's situation is complicated, so Perlozzo wanted the front office to make the decision.

                            "A lot of things factor in," he said. "Is he going to play or is he not going to play? How much is he going to play? And is it worthwhile to take that chance?"

                            Arn Tellem, Palmeiro's agent, did not return a telephone call seeking comment. House Government Reform Committee spokesman Dave Marin declined comment.

                            Congressional investigators looking into whether Palmeiro lied under oath when he appeared before the House Government Reform Committee in March and testified that he "never used steroids. Period."

                            Baseball has not said when the positive test occurred.

                            Palmeiro, who turns 41 on Saturday, is batting .266 with 18 homers and 60 RBI. He got his 3,000th hit on July 15, joining Hank Aaron, Willie Mays and Eddie Murray as the only players with 3,000 hits and 500 homers. Palmeiro's 569 homers rank him ninth on the career list.

                            Information from The Associated Press was used in this report. [/b][/quote]

                            "Can't buy what I want because it's free...
                            Can't buy what I want because it's free..."
                            -- Pearl Jam, from the single Corduroy

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              "Beattie also said that Palmeiro would issue a statement later Thursday denying that he accused Tejada of giving him a substance that may have caused a positive steroids test."

                              at what point does he realize most people don't believe him anymore?

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