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Norway votes to spend oil riches on welfare state

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  • Norway votes to spend oil riches on welfare state

    Sounds like this is a country Bush should look into invading. They have lots of oil!

    Also they apparently have a lot of political parties to keep one another in check...

    And no, I dont want to move there :P

    http://news.independent.co.uk/europe/article312192.ece

    The Norwegian opposition party regained power in the oil-rich country's general election yesterday, according to exit polls, after wooing voters with pledges to plough cash into their already generous welfare state system.

    Even before the latest surge in oil prices, Norway was ranked for five consecutive years by the United Nations as the best place to live in the world. Yet its low unemployment and a much-envied social security system have not stopped the issue of how much the government spends from dominating debate in the world's third-largest oil exporter.

    The Labour Party leader, Jens Stoltenberg, a 46-year-old economist who briefly served as Prime Minster between 2000 and 2001, looked set to regain power in a narrow victory, having fought a campaign which held that more could be done to eliminate the country's remaining social problems.

    With 90 per cent of the vote counted last night, the indications were that the Labour party had won 88 seats of the 169 seat parliament, Mr Stoltenberg fell short of declaring a victory, but he said that should his party win, he would form a "red-green" alliance with the Green Party and Socialist Left and Centre Party.

    The alliance wants to spend more oil cash on jobs, care for the elderly and education and a key plank of the parties campaign was that the tax cuts introduced by Prime Minister Kjell Magne Bondevik have served only to help the rich.

    In contrast, the centre-right governing coalition, led by Mr Bondevik, a 58-year-old Lutheran clergyman, had fought on a platform of lowering taxes.

    Speaking from his party campaign headquarters in Oslo, Mr Stoltenber said last night: "In this campaign we had two goals: a strong election for Labour and a chance to form a majority government. The one goal has been reached, the other is with in reach." He is likely to form a " Red-Green" coalition with the Socialist Left and Centre party.
    Mr Bondevik, whose alliance comprises his Christian People's Party, the Conservatives and Liberals, said he would stand down if the near-complete results proved to be the final outcome, but planned to stay on until parliament opened in mid-October. "If the forecasts are correct and this is the final result I will take the consequences," he said in a televised debate with other party leaders.

    Should he have survived the election, he would have faced calls for his resignation from the anti-immigration Progress Party, part of the centre-right coalition which had been denied cabinet posts, and had demanded a change of Prime Minister as the price of its support for any new administration.

    The Labour Party dominated Norwegian politics for nearly four decades after the Second World War, but no single party has commanded a majority since the early 1990s.

    The outgoing centre-right government has presided over four years of unprecedented prosperity in the country of 4.6 million, and unemployment in August was just 3.7 per cent, which compares favourably with 5.8 per cent in Denmark and 5.5 per cent in Sweden.

    Luxembourg is the only European country that can claim to be richer per head than Norway. And, as the biggest oil exporter after Saudi Arabia and Russia, the nation's wealth has been boosted by a windfall from record high energy prices.

    Norway's indigenous Sami people were also voting yesterday in elections for their own parliament, the Sametinget, a political contest given added significance by laws passed earlier this year extending the assembly's powers over the Arctic lands.
    “I’ve always stated, ‘I’m a Missouri Tiger,’” Anderson said March 13 after Arkansas fired John Pelphrey, adding, “I’m excited about what’s taking place here.”

    Asked then if he would talk to his players about the situation, he said, “They know me, and that’s where the trust comes in.

  • #2
    No offense Razzy, but I, for one, would not be very keen on paying 50%+ in income taxes. Not to mention a GST tax of 10-15% on all purcahses.

    Have you even been to Scandinavia? Standards of living are great, as are the benefits, but no one wants to work. Why work when 60% of that effort is given to the state?

    Thanks, but no thanks.

    Comment


    • #3
      I think they should shore up their levees with those profits.

      Comment


      • #4
        Fjords not Levees, Seppo.

        Comment


        • #5
          Fjords not Levees, Seppo.

          Levees works better though, don't you think, WW II guy?

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by Indu WangZi@Sep 12 2005, 10:27 PM
            No offense Razzy, but I, for one, would not be very keen on paying 50%+ in income taxes. Not to mention a GST tax of 10-15% on all purcahses.

            Have you even been to Scandinavia? Standards of living are great, as are the benefits, but no one wants to work. Why work when 60% of that effort is given to the state?

            Thanks, but no thanks.
            Wang,

            yeah I know the taxes are high over there.

            Scandinavia sounds good. Why work when you can live off the government?

            Where are you at now? Down Under?
            “I’ve always stated, ‘I’m a Missouri Tiger,’” Anderson said March 13 after Arkansas fired John Pelphrey, adding, “I’m excited about what’s taking place here.”

            Asked then if he would talk to his players about the situation, he said, “They know me, and that’s where the trust comes in.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by Razzy+Sep 12 2005, 09:33 PM-->
              QUOTE(Razzy @ Sep 12 2005, 09:33 PM)

            • #8
              Why should a man work hard if the state is going to take so much of his earnings?

              You can't build a great economy that way.

              This is not a model for us.

              Let's just execute our system better.
              Go Cards ...12 in 13.


              Comment


              • #9
                Originally posted by TTB@Sep 12 2005, 10:38 PM
                Why should a man work hard if the state is going to take so much of his earnings?
                I've had the pleasure of working with a few norweigens on projects and have found them to be very good workers. Probably the best nationality.

                Of course, this is just IT work and my experience is limited to Canadians, Philipines, Indians, Turkish, Chinese and Norweigens.

                Comment


                • #10
                  Originally posted by pgrote+Sep 12 2005, 09:45 PM-->
                  QUOTE(pgrote @ Sep 12 2005, 09:45 PM)

                • #11
                  Originally posted by Indu WangZi@Sep 12 2005, 10:49 PM
                  Actually, Grote..I'd agree with you. They are some of the best educated people in the world and generally are not only polite, but also have excellent skills.

                  My point was..the high tax rate is non-motivator to many.
                  That's an understatement. They weren't much for friendly chatter in the computer room.

                  Agreed about the taxes.

                  Comment


                  • #12
                    Originally posted by pgrote+Sep 12 2005, 10:45 PM-->
                    QUOTE(pgrote @ Sep 12 2005, 10:45 PM)

                  • #13
                    I used to work with a Russian kid when I delivered ice.

                    We ate lunch at Burger King once and hilarity insued when he ordered a Whopper. The poor girl at the counter didn't understand him becuase he pronounced it "Vopper." It was like an Abbott and Costello skit.
                    RIP Chris Jones 1971-2009
                    You'll never be forgotten.

                    Comment


                    • #14
                      I went to NationMaster.com and did a graph on taxation as a percentage of GDP.

                      Norway came in at 40.3% of GDP. The US was at 29.6%.

                      http://www.nationmaster.com/graph-T/tax_to...s_of_gdp&int=-1

                      Australia is only slightly higher than the US on this chart, while several European nations were even more heavily taxed than Norway is.
                      “I’ve always stated, ‘I’m a Missouri Tiger,’” Anderson said March 13 after Arkansas fired John Pelphrey, adding, “I’m excited about what’s taking place here.”

                      Asked then if he would talk to his players about the situation, he said, “They know me, and that’s where the trust comes in.

                      Comment


                      • #15
                        Originally posted by Razzy@Sep 12 2005, 10:04 PM
                        I went to NationMaster.com and did a graph on taxation as a percentage of GDP.

                        Norway came in at 40.3% of GDP. The US was at 29.6%.

                        http://www.nationmaster.com/graph-T/tax_to...s_of_gdp&int=-1

                        Australia is only slightly higher than the US on this chart, while several European nations were even more heavily taxed than Norway is.
                        Denmark should be #1..or close.

                        And..this just proves..Australia really is heaven.

                        Comment

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