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Sac Flies and Guys Who Don't Hit Them

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  • backstop
    replied
    One more thing: Adam Dunn is hitting .324/.427/.714 with 11 HR (and 30 strikeouts) since the all-star break.

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  • backstop
    replied
    Originally posted by kah@Aug 16 2005, 02:06 PM
    I don't think a sacrifice fly counts as "giving yourself up", since the batter is swinging away. (This is why the practice of not charging an at-bat for an SF should end). What lack of sac flies would seem to indicate is a player who whiffs too much. We know that Dunn doesn't hit sac flies b/c the only way he can put a ball in play is to hit it over the fence; is that true of the other players on that list?
    Helton: 7.03 PA/K
    Dye: 5.60
    Cabrera: 11.29
    Piazza: 6.37
    Giambi: 4.51
    Berkman: 8.50


    League leaders in sac flies:

    Craig Monroe: 7.16 PA/K
    Juan Uribe: 5.92
    Carl Everett: 5.88
    Shawn Green: 7.12


    Moral of the story: On a single-season basis, at least, the correlation between not hitting sac flies and striking out a lot is pretty gd weak. And sac flies are pretty random. I mean, Shawn Green is fourth in the majors, and he has a whopping 8 sac flies.

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  • justwundrin
    replied
    Abacuses.

    "My daddy Nabacuses like my mommy did."

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  • kah
    replied
    I don't think a sacrifice fly counts as "giving yourself up", since the batter is swinging away. (This is why the practice of not charging an at-bat for an SF should end). What lack of sac flies would seem to indicate is a player who whiffs too much. We know that Dunn doesn't hit sac flies b/c the only way he can put a ball in play is to hit it over the fence; is that true of the other players on that list?

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  • kennyboyerfan
    replied
    I don't know what any of this means, but I'm so grateful to see a baseball thread on here that I could cry.

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  • backstop
    started a topic Sac Flies and Guys Who Don't Hit Them

    Sac Flies and Guys Who Don't Hit Them

    This reminded me of the Dunn conversation...wish I'd looked this stuff up back then. Anyway, it's from the pocket-protector crowd at Prospectus, so get out your abacuses (abaci?)...


    Lance Berkman doesn’t have a single sacrifice fly in 374 plate appearances this year. If, as some would have us believe, a willingness to give oneself up in order to move runners over is the ultimate sign of a player’s true value, then here are the least valuable players in the majors this year:

    Players with most plate appearances and zero sac flies:

    439: Todd Helton, Rockies
    409: Jermaine Dye, White Sox
    393: Orlando Cabrera, Angels
    383: Mike Piazza, Mets
    380: Jason Giambi, Yankees
    374: Lance Berkman, Astros

    What is interesting about this list is that none of these men are leadoff hitters, unlike a number of the players on the all-time single-season list (starting in 1954, when they officially began counting the stat):

    751: Pete Rose, 1973 Reds
    721: Kirby Puckett, 1986 Twins
    705: Gene Richards, 1980 Padres
    704: Vada Pinson, 1959 Reds
    689: Steve Sax, 1982 Dodgers
    687: Tony Womack, 1997 Pirates
    686: Lou Brock, 1965 Cardinals
    684: Don Blasingame 1959 Cardinals
    683: Bill Bruton, 1955 Braves
    681: Adam Dunn, 2004 Reds

    Normally, when compiles a list of any sort, there are at least a couple of repeaters--players who show a pattern of a certain type of behavior. In this case, only one name appears twice in the top 32 all-time: Bill Bruton. It would seem that luck and circumstance play very important roles in a stat like this. As for Bruton, he went 611 appearances without one the year before, making for a two-year total of 1,294 sans sac-ing.

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