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Most Say They Are Less Safe Since 9/11

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  • Most Say They Are Less Safe Since 9/11

    Most Say They Are Less Safe Since 9/11

    By Christopher Lee
    Washington Post Staff Writer
    Thursday, April 1, 2004; Page A03

    Fewer than half of all Americans think the country is safer now than it was on Sept. 11, 2001, and more than three-quarters expect the United States to be the target of a major terrorist attack at home or abroad in the next few months, according to a new poll.

    The survey, released yesterday by the nonpartisan Council for Excellence in Government, found that about half of respondents were concerned that terrorists would strike near their home or work. Seventy-three percent identified themselves as anxious or concerned about terrorism, and 26 percent said they were calm.

    The survey findings come at a time when national security is a central issue in the presidential campaign, and after the Bush administration waged wars in Afghanistan and Iraq in the name of fighting terrorism and making the United States safer from foreign threats. The findings follow by one year the creation of the Department of Homeland Security to better focus government resources on the task of keeping Americans safe at home. And they exist in an environment in which numerous buildings and airports have been fortified with security checkpoints to ward off potential attacks.

    "These numbers present a big challenge," said Patricia McGinnis, president of the council, "because less than 50 percent feel more safe today than they did after September 11, after all that's happened."

    A spokesman for the Bush administration's National Security Council declined to comment on the record on the survey results.

    "If I were in the White House, I would be worried because the essence of what I'm arguing is that I am now safer than I was before," Daalder said. "The total money that we have spent on the war on terrorism writ large is well over $200 billion. And if I can't get people to see that we're safer, that either means that I'm not spending the money well or my message is not getting out or, in fact, they've given up. They don't think we can actually do much about it."

    http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/artic...-2004Mar31.html
    Norman Chad, syndicated columnist: “Sports radio, reflecting our sinking culture, spends entire days advising managers and coaches, berating managers and coaches, firing managers and coaches and searching the countryside for better middle relievers. If they just redirected their energy toward, say, crosswalk-signal maintenance, America would be 2 percent more livable.”

    "The best argument against democracy," someone (Churchill?) said, "is a five minute conversation with the average voter."

  • #2
    "Council for Excellence in Government"

    That's a good one!

    Comment


    • #3
      Sort of like "Military Intelligence"", huh?
      Norman Chad, syndicated columnist: “Sports radio, reflecting our sinking culture, spends entire days advising managers and coaches, berating managers and coaches, firing managers and coaches and searching the countryside for better middle relievers. If they just redirected their energy toward, say, crosswalk-signal maintenance, America would be 2 percent more livable.”

      "The best argument against democracy," someone (Churchill?) said, "is a five minute conversation with the average voter."

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by nick2@Apr 1 2004, 07:58 AM
        Sort of like "Military Intelligence"", huh?
        We can agree on that, nick.

        Comment


        • #5
          What I find ironic...

          There is a Council for Government Excellence...

          Finally...a definitive description of OXYMORON

          Comment


          • #6
            Of course we all feel less safe. 9/11 made us realize how much more vulnerable we are than we thought. That's not an indictment of the Administration despite your hopes.
            "Need some wood?" -- George W. Bush, October 8, 2004

            "Historians will judge if this war is just, not your punk ass." -- Dave Glover, December 8, 2004

            Comment


            • #7
              It's a shame that it took an event like 9/11 for Americans to realise what a dangerous place the world is...

              It rocked the comfy exsistence known as America to its core...and made everyone realise that there is one constant in this world...turmoil.

              I knew an attack was imminent well before 9/11...it's a pity it took that specific event for the public to realise what an uncertain world this is...

              Now...the response it what history will remember...be that good or bad

              Comment


              • #8
                Sorry to burst your bubble Pubs, but Bush will not be re-elected by a "you're-no-safer-today-than-before-the-war-on-terror" campaign. People better-to-hell feel safer with the present Commander, or they'll demand and get a new one. That's a political reality. :o

                Lap-dog Bush supporters, such as yourselves, will vote for him regardless-- but that's not why he's spending $200 million running as the candidate who can best run the war-on-terror.
                Norman Chad, syndicated columnist: “Sports radio, reflecting our sinking culture, spends entire days advising managers and coaches, berating managers and coaches, firing managers and coaches and searching the countryside for better middle relievers. If they just redirected their energy toward, say, crosswalk-signal maintenance, America would be 2 percent more livable.”

                "The best argument against democracy," someone (Churchill?) said, "is a five minute conversation with the average voter."

                Comment


                • #9
                  No shit, idiot.

                  People don't feel safer because of what happened on September 11, 2001. No matter what was done militarily or politically, people are going to feel less safe now than before.

                  Are you really this dumb?
                  When you say to your neighbor, "We're having a loud party on Saturday night if that's alright with you," what you really mean is, "We're having a loud party on Saturday night."

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by nick2@Apr 1 2004, 09:06 AM
                    Sorry to burst your bubble Pubs, but Bush will not be re-elected by a "you're-no-safer-today-than-before-the-war-on-terror" campaign. People better-to-hell feel safer with the present Commander, or they'll demand and get a new one. That's a political reality. :o

                    Lap-dog Bush supporters, such as yourselves, will vote for him regardless-- but that's not why he's spending $200 million running as the candidate who can best run the war-on-terror.
                    You would think a quality candidate would be a shoe in, unfortunately, the option is so horrendous that even with 3 million jobs lost, a less safe enviroment, record deficits and lying, they are still sniffing bush asshole.

                    Kinda telling
                    Un-Official Sponsor of Randy Choate and Kevin Siegrist

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      No shit, idiot.
                      Winston = Lap-dog Bush supporter. I rest my case.
                      Norman Chad, syndicated columnist: “Sports radio, reflecting our sinking culture, spends entire days advising managers and coaches, berating managers and coaches, firing managers and coaches and searching the countryside for better middle relievers. If they just redirected their energy toward, say, crosswalk-signal maintenance, America would be 2 percent more livable.”

                      "The best argument against democracy," someone (Churchill?) said, "is a five minute conversation with the average voter."

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Kinda telling
                        lazy: True: Sad state of arrairs. :rolleyes:
                        Norman Chad, syndicated columnist: “Sports radio, reflecting our sinking culture, spends entire days advising managers and coaches, berating managers and coaches, firing managers and coaches and searching the countryside for better middle relievers. If they just redirected their energy toward, say, crosswalk-signal maintenance, America would be 2 percent more livable.”

                        "The best argument against democracy," someone (Churchill?) said, "is a five minute conversation with the average voter."

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by phantom@Apr 1 2004, 10:14 AM
                          Of course we all feel less safe. 9/11 made us realize how much more vulnerable we are than we thought. That's not an indictment of the Administration despite your hopes.
                          My thoughts exactly.
                          Official 2014-15 Lounge Sponsor of Jori Lehterä
                          "He'll Finnish You Off"

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