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  • Dissatisfaction growing within the GOP and Dems..

    Fed-up Republicans join Libertarians


    U.S. Rep. Ron Paul (R-Texas) is slated to speak at a South Carolina Libertarian Party function on April 2, and the event is drawing support from unexpected quarters.

    "It is our hope that members of the Republican Party will stand beside Libertarians and realize that we stand -- in principle and action -- for what their party proclaims but no longer acts on," said event coordinator Cheryl Bates.

    But the South Carolina LP isn't just hoping. It is taking action and seeing results.

    Bates noted: "We're inviting GOP members to attend, to learn from this distinguished medical doctor."

    Paul is known as the LP's favorite Republican because of his refusal to approve any bill that isn't specifically approved by the U.S. Constitution.

    Among those who have purchased tickets to the Ron Paul dinner: GOP State Senate hopeful Ron Wilson, who purchased eight tickets to the dinner and six tickets to a reception to honor Paul.

    South Carolina Libertarians are tracking an increase in voter dissatisfaction, which is leading to an exodus from the Democrat and Republican parties. They have seen a marked increase in the number of larger party members who are showing an interest in libertarianism, Bates said.

    "Voters are voicing their concerns that neither of the major political parties is presenting people with candidates who will obey the will of the electorate," said LP activist R.E. Sutherland.

    "Republicans have broken their Contract with America and have consistently failed to vote according to the Republican Platform," says Chris Panos, who recently defected from the Republican Party to the LP.

    Panos began his political career long ago, when he worked for Barry Goldwater, and he has since managed many Republican political campaigns. He also served as a Midwest Director for Ronald Reagan's presidential campaign.

    Now, he said, he can no longer "trust the GOP leadership to serve my Republican principles."

    Sentiments like Panos's are what led the SCLP to invite Paul to speak. And it's not only Republicans who are shifting sides.

    One of the more vocal members who has come into the LP is Steve Cain, who -- after running for office in several high-profile races as a Democrat -- joined the LP about a year ago, Sutherland said.

    Asked why he made the flip, Cain said: "I did not leave the Democratic Party. They left me."

    Since then, he ran for the state Senate as a Libertarian and shows promise of becoming a distinguished LP office holder when he runs again, Bates said. The dinner, to which representatives and voters from all political parties are invited, will center around Paul's speech regarding the USA-Patriot Act. The SCLP hopes the event will recruit more Republicans.

    Will Paul help? Could be, and that's what South Carolina Libertarians are counting on.

    "Dr. Paul is the leading spokesman in Washington for limited constitutional government, low taxes, free markets, and a return to sound monetary policies based on commodity-backed currency," Bates said. "He has proven again and again that consistently upholding the U.S. Constitution is actually good politics."

    For more information on the event, call 803-657-3442, visit www.sc.lp.org, or e-mail [email protected].
    Make America Great For Once.

  • #2
    I would think Libertarians are flipping out about that Medicare thing, especially given that it appears the Bush administration knew their projected numbers were way low.
    Dude. Can. Fly.

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    • #3
      Kev,

      Let me know when man bites dog.

      Paul is a great statesman, but he has been the LP presidential candidate in previous election cycles.
      And, frankly, it has never occured to me that "winning" a debate is important, or that I should be hurt when someone like Airshark or kah, among others (for whom winning a pseudo debate or declaring intellectual superiority over invisible others is obviously very important) ridicule me.

      -The Artist formerly known as King in KC

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      • #4
        Go Libertarians
        Norman Chad, syndicated columnist: “Sports radio, reflecting our sinking culture, spends entire days advising managers and coaches, berating managers and coaches, firing managers and coaches and searching the countryside for better middle relievers. If they just redirected their energy toward, say, crosswalk-signal maintenance, America would be 2 percent more livable.”

        "The best argument against democracy," someone (Churchill?) said, "is a five minute conversation with the average voter."

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        • #5
          1/2 of 1% - tops
          And, frankly, it has never occured to me that "winning" a debate is important, or that I should be hurt when someone like Airshark or kah, among others (for whom winning a pseudo debate or declaring intellectual superiority over invisible others is obviously very important) ridicule me.

          -The Artist formerly known as King in KC

          Comment


          • #6
            The more noise made by libertarians, the better it is for republicans. The media gets it wrong---they will say a vote for a libertarian is a vote for Kerry. A vote for Nader is a vote for Bush. This is wrong. The intense intellectual energy by libertarians focuses sharply on everything republicans do not like about democrats. It helps shift the overall debate to things republicans are more comfortable with, and away from things that concern democrats. There is always a small percentage who will actually vote for a libertarian instead of the republican, (or Nader instead of the democrat), but that number is dwarfed by the overall contribution to the whole political debate by parties too principled to be practical.
            v


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