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  • Bush-Kerry: On the issues!

    Bush vs. Kerry at a glance
    How Republican, Democrat stand on key issues
    MSNBC staff and news service reports
    Updated: 11:02 a.m. ET March 08, 2004
    Here's a quick look at where Sen. John Kerry and President Bush stand on the central issues expected to dominate the 2004 race for the White House.

    Economy
    Bush: The president has repeatedly called on Congress to make his tax cuts permanent, saying failure to do so would amount to a tax hike and threaten prospects for a robust economic recovery capable of generating new jobs. Congressional analysts say that making the tax cuts permanent would cost about $1.3 trillion over the next 10 years.
    Kerry: Kerry has called for repeal of the Bush tax cuts for Americans earning more than $200,000 a year, in order to pay for broad health care reform. However, he would retain the tax cuts for the middle class. He says he can halve the record half-trillion dollar budget by the end of one four-year term, even while spending $72 billion a year to extend health care to 27 million of the 40-plus million uninsured. His campaign has provided no details.

    Energy and environment
    Bush: Bush, who pulled the United States out of the Kyoto protocol on greenhouse gas emissions, believes the threat of global warming should be addressed through new economic growth and efficiency. He also favors oil exploration in Alaska’s Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and backs legislation that would seek to reduce air pollution and acid rain by offering major polluters access to market-based incentives to reduce harmful emissions.
    Kerry: Kerry favors U.S. participation in an international climate change program to curb global warming and would cut mercury emissions by American utilities and plants. To encourage more renewable energy sources, Kerry wants to create a renewable energy trust fund to reduce oil consumption by 2 million barrels per day, which is roughly the amount imported from the Middle East. Kerry also backed Senate legislation to impose stricter mileage standards on gas-guzzling sport utility vehicles and automobiles.

    Foreign policy
    Bush: After straining relations with major European allies and the United Nations over war in Iraq, Bush has shifted his foreign policy focus to the spread of democracy by pushing a Greater Middle East Initiative that would aim to resolve the region’s political, economic and social problems through democratic reform. The president, criticized for the failure to find weapons of mass destruction in Iraq, is also pursuing a policy that seeks to unravel the black market in nuclear components and block programs in North Korea and Iran, countries he has labeled an “axis of evil” along with prewar Iraq.
    Kerry: While insisting he would never cede U.S. security to any other nation and would use force when required, Kerry envisions “a new era of alliances” to replace what he sees as the White House’s go-it-alone approach to foreign policy. He has pledged to restore diplomacy as a tool of U.S. foreign policy, treat the United Nations as a “full partner” and pursue collective security arrangements. His inner circle of foreign policy advisers features prominent Democratic veterans, including some figures from the Clinton days.

    Post-war Iraq
    Bush: After seeing his plan to bring democracy to Iraq through regional caucuses scuttled by a leading Shi’ite cleric, Bush has succeeded in brokering an interim constitution for the oil-rich Arab nation and pledged to work with Iraqi leaders and the United Nations to prepare for full Iraqi sovereignty by June 30. The administration expects U.S. troops to remain in Iraq indefinitely as a security measure against insurgents and sectarian violence.
    Kerry: He voted in 2002 in favor of the war against Iraq, but has since attacked the administration for misrepresenting the military threat posed by Baghdad and for mismanaging the post-war occupation. He later voted against the appropriation of $87 billion for the U.S.-led effort, a move that has led some critics, including some in his own party, to accuse him of hypocrisy.

    Trade
    Bush: Bush, an avowed free trader, has embarked on a series of trade agreements with countries in Asia, Latin America and Africa. But his administration has also faced charges of protectionism over steel tariffs that the World Trade Organization ruled illegal, and its reluctance to trim import barriers that protect U.S. sugar, dairy and beef industries.
    Kerry: Kerry has promised a 120-day review of all existing U.S. trade agreements upon taking office, and favors using the World Trade Organization to challenge China’s currency practices. He also has pressed for stronger labor and environmental language than Bush has required in growing collection of bilateral free trade agreements with countries around the world.

    Israel and the Palestinians
    Bush: Bush, a staunch defender of Israel, backs the stalled “road map” to Middle East peace that calls for creation of a Palestinian state alongside Israel by next year. The White House has also expressed concern about Israel’s construction of a security barrier through Palestinian territory, ostracized Palestinian President Yasser Arafat and cautiously embraced Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon’s proposal to dismantle Jewish settlements in Gaza.
    Kerry: Kerry says he would breath new life into the moribund Middle East peace process and name a special presidential envoy to the Muslim world, who would seek to encourage moderate elements.

    Reuters contributed to this report.
    Norman Chad, syndicated columnist: “Sports radio, reflecting our sinking culture, spends entire days advising managers and coaches, berating managers and coaches, firing managers and coaches and searching the countryside for better middle relievers. If they just redirected their energy toward, say, crosswalk-signal maintenance, America would be 2 percent more livable.”

    "The best argument against democracy," someone (Churchill?) said, "is a five minute conversation with the average voter."

  • #2
    "Congressional analysts say that making the tax cuts permanent would cost about $1.3 trillion over the next 10 years."

    Tax cuts don't cost anything, they aren't an expense.
    Asked what he would do differently in Iraq, Kerry said, "Right now, what I would do differently is, I mean, look, I'm not the president, and I didn't create this mess so I don't want to acknowledge a mistake that I haven't made."

    Comment


    • #3
      Kerry: Kerry has called for repeal of the Bush tax cuts for Americans earning more than $200,000 a year, in order to pay for broad health care reform. However, he would retain the tax cuts for the middle class. He says he can halve the record half-trillion dollar budget by the end of one four-year term, even while spending $72 billion a year to extend health care to 27 million of the 40-plus million uninsured. His campaign has provided no details.
      Interesting. Who's to say it won't work?

      Kerry: Kerry says he would breath new life into the moribund Middle East peace process
      Whew, that makes me feel better. Why doesn't Bush do that "breath new life" thing? It seems so obvious.

      Kerry: While insisting he would never cede U.S. security to any other nation and would use force when required, Kerry envisions “a new era of alliances” to replace what he sees as the White House’s go-it-alone approach to foreign policy. He has pledged to restore diplomacy as a tool of U.S. foreign policy, treat the United Nations as a “full partner” and pursue collective security arrangements.
      No thanks.
      "Need some wood?" -- George W. Bush, October 8, 2004

      "Historians will judge if this war is just, not your punk ass." -- Dave Glover, December 8, 2004

      Comment


      • #4
        Tax cuts don't cost anything, they aren't an expense.
        Right. Everything is free! Nobody pays for anything!

        Bushonomics 101.
        Norman Chad, syndicated columnist: “Sports radio, reflecting our sinking culture, spends entire days advising managers and coaches, berating managers and coaches, firing managers and coaches and searching the countryside for better middle relievers. If they just redirected their energy toward, say, crosswalk-signal maintenance, America would be 2 percent more livable.”

        "The best argument against democracy," someone (Churchill?) said, "is a five minute conversation with the average voter."

        Comment


        • #5
          Kerry: While insisting he would never cede U.S. security to any other nation and would use force when required, Kerry envisions “a new era of alliances” to replace what he sees as the White House’s go-it-alone approach to foreign policy. He has pledged to restore diplomacy as a tool of U.S. foreign policy, treat the United Nations as a “full partner” and pursue collective security arrangements.


          No thanks.

          Bush has succeeded in brokering an interim constitution for the oil-rich Arab nation and pledged to work with Iraqi leaders and the United Nations to prepare for full Iraqi sovereignty by June 30.
          Half partner?
          Norman Chad, syndicated columnist: “Sports radio, reflecting our sinking culture, spends entire days advising managers and coaches, berating managers and coaches, firing managers and coaches and searching the countryside for better middle relievers. If they just redirected their energy toward, say, crosswalk-signal maintenance, America would be 2 percent more livable.”

          "The best argument against democracy," someone (Churchill?) said, "is a five minute conversation with the average voter."

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by BurnKU@Mar 12 2004, 04:36 PM
            "Congressional analysts say that making the tax cuts permanent would cost about $1.3 trillion over the next 10 years."

            Tax cuts don't cost anything, they aren't an expense.
            Everyone just guesses. It could be that lower taxes lead to so much investment and wealth that the lower rates actually collect more revenue. (Reagan-Laffer, etc.). Or not. Same thing can happen with interest rate cuts by the federal reserves. Or not. Increasing the deficit can be inflationary---the biggest joke of all on the rich---hasn't happened for a long time, but could. Cutting taxes or interest rates should be inflationary (gives us more money to chase the same goods), but it has not seemed to be for several years. Conservatives think that cutting taxes will inevitably cut federal spending----then they find things near and dear to spend us into deficits. Liberals want to raise taxes---sometimes Reagan and Laffer can be right---it brings less revenue because of the drag on investment. But not always. Everyone just guesses, because the answers are always elusive and changing.
            v


            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by nick2@Mar 12 2004, 04:52 PM
              Tax cuts don't cost anything, they aren't an expense.
              Right. Everything is free! Nobody pays for anything!

              Bushonomics 101.
              That's not what I'm saying. A reduction in tax rates would (as some believe) cause a reduction in revenues, not an increase in expenses.

              Good post, I wish you wouldn't have posted it on Friday afternoon though.
              Asked what he would do differently in Iraq, Kerry said, "Right now, what I would do differently is, I mean, look, I'm not the president, and I didn't create this mess so I don't want to acknowledge a mistake that I haven't made."

              Comment


              • #8
                Good post nick2, but the article left one thing out:

                Extremist Asshat Attorney General
                Bush: Bush, a staunch defender extremist asshats. Nominated one to be Attorney General.

                Kerry: Kerry voted against the nomination of an extremist asshat for Attorney General. Prefers sane, rational AGs.
                2005 Mandatory Loyalty Oath: I love America, our troops, baseball, Moms, and certain pies. I want no harm to come to any of those institutions, nor do I take any glee in their demise.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by nick2@Mar 12 2004, 04:27 PM

                  Kerry: Kerry says he would breath new life into the moribund Middle East peace process and name a special presidential envoy to the Muslim world, who would seek to encourage moderate elements.

                  I just love it when people who want to "lead" the "free world" have nothing better to say than they will "appoint" an "envoy" or "nominate" a "committee" to look over the issue.

                  This is the difference between wealth creators and frauds. Wealth creators don't have time for appointments and committees.

                  They act.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by King in KC@Mar 12 2004, 06:02 PM
                    AThis is the difference between wealth creators and frauds. Wealth creators don't have time for appointments and committees.

                    They act.
                    Agreed King.

                    http://www.cwnews.com/news/viewstory.cfm?recnum=17349
                    Bush Appoints New Head Of Faith-Based Initiative

                    WASHINGTON, DC, Feb 1, 02 (CWNews.com) - President George W. Bush on Friday appointed Jim Towey, founder of the group Aging with Dignity, to head the office in charge of his faith-based charities initiative.
                    2005 Mandatory Loyalty Oath: I love America, our troops, baseball, Moms, and certain pies. I want no harm to come to any of those institutions, nor do I take any glee in their demise.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      treat the United Nations as a “full partner
                      Because doing everything by ourselves and giving the rest of the world the finger all the time is so much better.

                      I just love it when people who want to "lead" the "free world" have nothing better to say than they will "appoint" an "envoy"
                      Because the whole concept of appointing ambassadors, negotiators, and representatives of the U.S. government to negotiate for us overseas is silly. Perhaps we should just close down the State Department.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by kah2523@Mar 12 2004, 06:06 PM
                        Perhaps we should just close down the State Department.
                        Another great idea, kah. If you had been the first to think of it, I would give you credit.

                        Well said.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Trigfunctions@Mar 12 2004, 06:05 PM

                          WASHINGTON, DC, Feb 1, 02 (CWNews.com) - President George W. Bush on Friday appointed Jim Towey, founder of the group Aging with Dignity, to head the office in charge of his faith-based charities initiative.
                          Exactly, trig. This is the kind of crap that stupid people lap up like hungry children.

                          "Oh, Bush appointed a guy to look over faith-based initiatives. How wonderful."

                          Help us, Lord, help us.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I agree.

                            The only difference is that I believe it's JUST as stupid when the Democraps do it.
                            And, frankly, it has never occured to me that "winning" a debate is important, or that I should be hurt when someone like Airshark or kah, among others (for whom winning a pseudo debate or declaring intellectual superiority over invisible others is obviously very important) ridicule me.

                            -The Artist formerly known as King in KC

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